Log In

Forgot Password?
Create New Account

Loading... please wait

Abstract Details

Analyzing Sex Differences in Huntington’s Disease using Enroll-HD
Movement Disorders
P6 - Poster Session 6 (12:00 PM-1:00 PM)
3-002
Neurodegenerative diseases are influenced by a multitude of factors from genetics to the geographic environment. While much is known about the genetics of Huntington’s disease (HD), sex-dependent differences in outcomes for this particular disease have not been fully uncovered. Other neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease have been shown to have clear sex-dependent differences in disease prevalence and onset. Interpretation of these differences has an important role in optimizing treatment and better understanding disease mechanism in HD.

This study was designed to analyze sex-dependent differences in manifest HD patients from the Enroll HD database.

Longitudinal study data from baseline and follow-up visits of manifest HD patients (N=8,043) from the Enroll-HD database were analyzed. Linear mixed models were used to assess differences between males and females regarding the motor, behavioral, and cognitive functioning over a series of four annual visits.

 

Manifest HD patients showed significant sex-dependent differences in motor and depressive symptoms. While both sexes showed worsening motor and depressive symptoms over the course of 4 annual visits, female patients with HD consistently presented with more severe motor and depressive symptoms than males (p<0.0001). 

We did not find any difference between male and female patients with HD regarding age at clinical HD diagnosis or the number of CAG repeats. Also, there were no differences between males and females when we evaluated cognitive performance and severity of apathy, irritability/aggressive, psychosis and executive function scores as measured by the Problem Behaviors Assessment – Short (PBA-s) over the four visits.

Our analyses suggest that females overall have worse motor and depressive symptoms than males in the course of HD progression. The importance of continuing to identify sex differences in disease phenotype, progression, and neuropathology is critical for further advancing our understanding of and treatment for individuals with HD.

 
Authors/Disclosures
Erin Furr-Stimming, MD, FAAN (University of Texas Health Science Center-Houston)
PRESENTER
Dr. Furr-Stimming has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Teva Pharmaceuticals. Dr. Furr-Stimming has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Michael J. Fox Foundation. Dr. Furr-Stimming has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Medscape. Dr. Furr-Stimming has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for Teva Pharmaceuticals. The institution of Dr. Furr-Stimming has received research support from Huntington's Disease Society of America. The institution of Dr. Furr-Stimming has received research support from Roche/Genetech. The institution of Dr. Furr-Stimming has received research support from Uniqure. The institution of Dr. Furr-Stimming has received research support from CHDI. The institution of Dr. Furr-Stimming has received research support from Huntington Study Group/Neurocrine. The institution of Dr. Furr-Stimming has received research support from NIH/University of Iowa. The institution of Dr. Furr-Stimming has received research support from Sage Therapeutics. Dr. Furr-Stimming has received publishing royalties from a publication relating to health care.
Samantha Hentosh Miss Hentosh has nothing to disclose.
No disclosure on file
Joseph W. Furr, Jr., MD No disclosure on file
Natalia Pessoa Rocha No disclosure on file