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Abstract Details

Role of supplementary motor area in cervical dystonia and sensory tricks
Movement Disorders
S32 - Movement Disorders: Dystonia and Tremor Disorders (4:30 PM-4:42 PM)
006

Sensory tricks are a characteristic feature of cervical dystonia (CD) where light touch on the adjacent area of the dystonia temporarily improves symptoms. Clinical benefit from sensory tricks can be observed before the tactile contact is made or even by imagination.  We hypothesized that the supplementary motor area (SMA) may dynamically interact with the sensorimotor network and other brain regions during sensory tricks in patients with CD.

We aimed to examine the functional connectivity of the SMA at rest and during sensory trick performance and imagination in CD patients compared to healthy controls (HC) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

Twenty-three CD patients and sensory tricks and 23 HC underwent fMRI scans at rest and while performing and imagining sensory tricks.  
At rest, functional connectivity between the SMA and left intraparietal sulcus (IPS) region was lower in CD patients. With sensory trick imagination and performance, SMA-left IPS connectivity increased in CD patients while it decreased in HC. SMA-right cerebellum connectivity also increased with sensory trick imagination in CD patients, while it decreased in HC. 

In CD patients, SMA connectivity increased in the brain regions involved in sensorimotor integration during sensory trick performance and imagination. Our study results showed a crucial role of SMA in sensorimotor processing during sensory tricks and suggest the SMA and IPS could be potential therapeutic targets for brain modulation. 

Authors/Disclosures
Hyun Cho (NIH)
PRESENTER
Dr. Cho has nothing to disclose.
No disclosure on file
Pattamon Panyakaew (Chulalongkorn Parkinson Center) No disclosure on file
Karin Mente (Louis Stokes Cleveland VA) The institution of Dr. Mente has received research support from National Institute on Aging.
Demelio Urbano Mr. Urbano has nothing to disclose.
Mark Hallett (National Institutes of Health) Dr. Hallett has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Janssen. Dr. Hallett has received personal compensation in the range of $0-$499 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for Brainsway. Dr. Hallett has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for VoxNeuro. Dr. Hallett has received personal compensation in the range of $5,000-$9,999 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for QuantalX. Dr. Hallett has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as an Editor, Associate Editor, or Editorial Advisory Board Member for Elsevier. Dr. Hallett has received intellectual property interests from a discovery or technology relating to health care. Dr. Hallett has received publishing royalties from a publication relating to health care. Dr. Hallett has received publishing royalties from a publication relating to health care. Dr. Hallett has received publishing royalties from a publication relating to health care. Dr. Hallett has received publishing royalties from a publication relating to health care. Dr. Hallett has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Speaker with International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. Dr. Hallett has a non-compensated relationship as a President, Past-president with International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology that is relevant to AAN interests or activities. Dr. Hallett has a non-compensated relationship as a President, Past-President with Functional Neurological Disorder Society that is relevant to AAN interests or activities.
No disclosure on file