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Abstract Details

Scoping Review: Innovations in Clinical Neurology Education
Education, Research, and Methodology
S34 - Research Methodology and Education (2:24 PM-2:36 PM)
008
Advances in adult learning theory and instructional technologies provide opportunities to end neurophobia.  The purpose of this scoping review was to survey the emerging landscape of educational innovation in clinical neurology. 
N/A
With the assistance of a research librarian, we conducted a literature search on November 4, 2020, using the following databases: PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Cochrane Library, ERIC, and PsycINFO. The search strategy combined keywords and subject headings from the concepts of innovation, education, and neurology.  We included studies of innovative teaching methods for medical students through attending physician level learners.  We excluded interventions for undergraduate students and established methods of teaching, as well as those published before 2010.  Two authors independently reviewed all abstracts to determine advancement to full text review, and this was repeated for full texts to determine inclusion.  In the case of disagreement, a third author acted as arbiter. Data extraction for included full texts and abstracts consists of study design, education innovation, study participants, outcomes, and results.
Among 3,418 identified publications, 301 (144 full texts, 157 abstracts) studies were selected for analysis.  The most common innovations were simulation (133), eLearning, including web-based software and video-based learning (70), 3-D modeling/printing (31), podcasts/smart phone applications/social media (24), team-based learning (20), flipped classroom (16), virtual/augmented reality (17), problem-based learning (11), and gamification (4). Seventy-nine (26%) articles included a study design with a comparison group, but only 16 of those randomized learners to an intervention. Most studies relied on Kirkpatrick’s Level 1 outcomes – the perceptions of training by learners. Only 13 studies were included from 2010-2011, with 74 studies from 2019-2020.  
There has been an explosion of innovative educational methods in clinical neurology over the last decade, especially in the areas of simulation and eLearning. Most reports lack adequate scientific rigor to properly assess the respective innovation’s merits.   
Authors/Disclosures
William Zimmerman
PRESENTER
Dr. Zimmerman has nothing to disclose.
Melissa Pergakis Dr. Pergakis has nothing to disclose.
No disclosure on file
Nicholas Morris (University of Maryland Medical Center) The institution of Dr. Morris has received research support from UMB ICTR through NIH NCATS&CTSA grant 1UL1TR003098. The institution of Dr. Morris has received research support from University of Maryland Medical Center. The institution of Dr. Morris has received research support from National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Dr. Morris has received personal compensation in the range of $0-$499 for serving as a Grand Rounds Speaker with New York University. Dr. Morris has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Grand Rounds Speaker with Mount Sinai Health System. Dr. Morris has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Continuum Article Author with American Academy of Neurology. Dr. Morris has received personal compensation in the range of $0-$499 for serving as a Reviewer with Society of Critical Care Medicine. Dr. Morris has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Grand Rounds Speaker with New York Medical College.