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Abstract Details

Psychophysiological Markers Predict the Effect of Propranolol on Conversational Reciprocity in Autism Spectrum Disorder
Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology
P9 - Poster Session 9 (5:30 PM-6:30 PM)
6-002

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by impaired social interaction and communication as well as repetitive behaviors and restricted interests.  Current pharmacotherapy targets psychiatric comorbid conditions, and no agent is proven to target the core features.  Past trials were frequently characterized by a high degree of individual variability of response to drugs. Propranolol is a non-selective beta-adrenergic antagonist, often used to treat performance anxiety. Our previous work found propranolol improved conversational reciprocity in patients with ASD with a single dose psychopharmacological challenge study.  Herein we examine whether psychophysiological measures predict response to propranolol on conversational reciprocity in ASD in an open-label extension of a clinical trial.

Our objective is to examine psychophysiological predictors of response on a social measure in open-label extension data from a clinical trail of propranolol in autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Forty-seven ASD participants, age 7-24 titrated propranolol to 100mg a day in divided doses, or a body weight adjusted dose in younger children.  Baseline heart rate variability (HRV) was assessed, and social reciprocity from the General Social Outcomes Measure (GSOM) at baseline and 12-weeks.  HRV measures were correlated with change in performance on social reciprocity from the GSOM, performed separately for participants ages 7-14 and ages 15-24 due to changes in psychophysiology across development.

For 7-14 year old participants, there was a significant negative correlation between change in conversational reciprocity and baseline standard deviation of the heart rate (Pearson’s r = -0.490, p = 0.018, n = 24).  This was not observed in older participants.

Psychophysiological markers associated with arousal and sympathetic/parasympathetic balance appear to predict response to propranolol on aspects of social interaction.  Larger trials will need to confirm the apparent specificity to the younger population, and establish broader understanding of markers predicting best responders to propranolol in ASD.

Authors/Disclosures
David Q. Beversdorf, MD, FAAN (University of Missouri)
PRESENTER
Dr. Beversdorf has received personal compensation in the range of $0-$499 for serving as a Consultant for Yamo pharmaceuticals. Dr. Beversdorf has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Human Biosciences. Dr. Beversdorf has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Impel Neuropharma. Dr. Beversdorf has received personal compensation in the range of $0-$499 for serving as a Consultant for Stalicla. Dr. Beversdorf has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Scioto. Dr. Beversdorf has received personal compensation in the range of $5,000-$9,999 for serving as an Editor, Associate Editor, or Editorial Advisory Board Member for Elsevier (Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders). The institution of Dr. Beversdorf has received research support from BionexusKC. The institution of Dr. Beversdorf has received research support from Autism Research Institute. Dr. Beversdorf has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as a Case Consultant with Best Doctors.
Bradley Ferguson Bradley Ferguson has received research support from United States Department of Defense.
Carrina Appling (University of Missouri Columbia) Mrs. Appling has nothing to disclose.
Nanan Nuraini (Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders) Mrs. Nuraini has nothing to disclose.
Samantha Hunter Samantha Hunter has nothing to disclose.
Kathy Hirst Kathy Hirst has nothing to disclose.
Bridget Lolli Bridget Lolli has nothing to disclose.
Julie Muckerman (University of Missouri) Julie Muckerman has nothing to disclose.
Ryan Holem (University of Missouri School of Medicine) Ryan Holem has nothing to disclose.
Nicole Takahashi Nicole Takahashi has nothing to disclose.