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Abstract Details

Migraine and the Risk of Venous Thromboembolism among Women
Headache
P6 - Poster Session 6 (5:30 PM-6:30 PM)
15-001

Prior studies report increased risk of incident cardiovascular disease among individuals with migraine. However, evidence on the association between migraine and risk of VTE is mixed. Genetic analyses have suggested etiologic relationships of hemostasis factors on migraine, highlighting the need to better understand if migraine is a risk factor for VTE.

To estimate the effect of migraine on the risk of incident venous thromboembolism (VTE) among middle-aged and older women.

The study population included 27,086 women enrolled in the Women’s Health Study who, at baseline, provided a blood sample and did not have a history of VTE or missing migraine information. Women were classified as having active migraine with aura, active migraine without aura, past history of migraine, or no history of migraine. Self-reported new diagnoses of VTE were confirmed by medical record review and classified as provoked or unprovoked. Cox proportional hazards models evaluated associations between migraine status and incident VTE.

During a mean follow-up of 21.0 years, there were 731 incident VTE events (including 299 unprovoked events). Compared to those with no history of migraine, women who reported active migraine at baseline had an increased risk of VTE, adjusting for age, randomized treatment assignment to aspirin and/or vitamin E, and body mass index (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.30, 95% confidence interval: 1.09-1.55). This association was similar regardless of aura status (migraine with aura: HR=1.33, 95% CI: 1.03-1.74; migraine without aura: HR=1.27, 95% CI: 1.02-1.59). In contrast, those with past history of migraine did not have an increased risk of VTE (HR=0.95, 95% CI: 0.72-1.25). Findings were similar for unprovoked VTE and after adjustment for confounding.

Active migraine at baseline was associated with an increased risk of VTE in this large cohort of middle-aged and older women.
Authors/Disclosures
Pamela M. Rist, PhD (Brigham & Women's Hospital)
PRESENTER
The institution of Dr. Rist has received research support from National Institutes of Health. The institution of Dr. Rist has received research support from Brigham and Women's Hospital.
No disclosure on file
No disclosure on file
Daniel Chasman, PhD (Division of Preventive Medicine) Daniel Chasman has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Takeda. Daniel Chasman has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving on a Speakers Bureau for Amgen. Daniel Chasman has received research support from Pfizer. Daniel Chasman has received intellectual property interests from a discovery or technology relating to health care.
No disclosure on file
Tobias Kurth, MD, ScD, FAAN (Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin) Dr. Kurth has received personal compensation in the range of $5,000-$9,999 for serving as a Consultant for TotalEnergies. Dr. Kurth has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Eli Lilly & Company. Dr. Kurth has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as an Editor, Associate Editor, or Editorial Advisory Board Member for BMJ. Dr. Kurth has received personal compensation in the range of $5,000-$9,999 for serving as an Editor, Associate Editor, or Editorial Advisory Board Member for Frontiers. The institution of Dr. Kurth has received research support from German Joint Committee. The institution of Dr. Kurth has received research support from Ministry of Health.