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Abstract Details

Reaching Accuracy Assessment in Cerebellar Stroke using Virtual Reality
Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology
S20 - Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology: Clinical Trials and Outcomes Studies (5:18 PM-5:30 PM)
010
Dysmetria, the inability to measure distance in muscular tasks correctly, is a characteristic clinical feature of cerebellar injury. Even though dysmetria can be quickly detected during the neurological examination with the finger-to-nose test, objective quantification of reaching accuracy for clinical assessment is still lacking. Emerging VR technology, together with recent improvements in the hand-tracking feature, offers an opportunity to closely examine the speed, accuracy, and consistency of fine hand movements and proprioceptive function.
To investigate the application of virtual reality (VR) in the rapid quantification of reaching accuracy at the bedside for patients with cerebellar stroke (CS).

29 individuals (10 CS patients and 19 age-matched not-disabled controls) performed a task measuring reaching accuracy on the VR headset (Oculus Quest 2). 50% of the trials displayed a visible rendering of the hand as the participant reached for the target (visible hand condition), while the remaining 50% only showed the target being extinguished (invisible hand condition). Reaching error was calculated as the difference in degrees between where the fingertip passed the arch and where the target was positioned. 


Reaching error was higher in CS than in age-matched controls in both visible hand and invisible hand conditions. Reaching error was higher in the invisible hand condition than in the visible hand condition in both healthy controls and CS patients. Average time taken to perform each trial was higher in CS patients than in controls in both visible and invisible hand conditions.
Reaching accuracy assessed by VR promises to be a non-invasive and rapid approach to quantifying fine motor functions in clinical settings. In addition, this device has the potential to be a useful supplemental technology in monitoring fine motor and proprioceptive functions during physical rehabilitation. Further studies are needed to examine quantitative changes in reaching accuracy during post-stroke progression.
Authors/Disclosures
Khai Du (University of Rochester)
PRESENTER
Mr. Du has nothing to disclose.
Leonardo Roberto Benavides Mr. Benavides has received personal compensation for serving as an employee of Stryker.
Emily Isenstein Emily Isenstein has received research support from Autism Science Foundation.
Duje Tadin, PhD (University of Rochester) Prof. Tadin has received personal compensation in the range of $50,000-$99,999 for serving as a Consultant for NeuroTrainer. Prof. Tadin has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as an Expert Witness for Finkelstein and partners. The institution of Prof. Tadin has received research support from NIH. The institution of Prof. Tadin has received research support from The Brain & Behavior Research Foundation. Prof. Tadin has received intellectual property interests from a discovery or technology relating to health care.
Ania Busza, MD, PhD (University of Rochester) Dr. Busza has received research support from NIH/NINDS. Dr. Busza has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Grant reviewer with NIH.