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Abstract Details

Is Dual Antiplatelet Therapy Underutilized Following TIA and Minor Stroke?
Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology
S3 - Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology: Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Population Health (2:00 PM-2:12 PM)
006
Initiation of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) with aspirin and clopidogrel plays a significant role in the secondary prevention of recurrent acute ischemic events following high risk transient ischemic attack (TIA) and minor acute ischemic stroke (AIS). However, some patients do not receive the same targeted therapy on discharge and are only maintained on single antiplatelet therapy.
Our aim was to identify the variations in single vs dual antiplatelet prescribing practices at the time of discharge within a major Stroke Clinical Network.

The GWTG registry was queried for patients >18 years old with a TIA or a minor AIS (NIHSS <5), who were admitted to a single hospital network between January 2018 and December 2021. Demographics collected including age, race, gender, and BMI. Patients on concurrent anticoagulation were excluded. We evaluated antiplatelet discharge practices at the tertiary stroke center vs the entire network, among men vs. women, African Americans (AA) vs whites, age 18-70 vs >70 years, and across BMI.

Among 2953 patients with a TIA or minor AIS, the mean age was 67.3 (SD +/- 13.8 years), with 42% >70 years of age. 47.8% were women; 37% were AA; 60% were white. DAPT was prescribed at the time of discharge to 40% of patients overall. Gender was a significant factor with men (43%) more likely to get prescribed DAPT than females (37%) (p=.002). While BMI did not have a lone effect on number of antiplatelets (AP) prescribed, when it was included as a covariate, there was a significant effect on the number of AP prescribed; with the higher the BMI, the less likely patients were to receive DAPT.

We identified underutilization of DAPT following TIA and minor stroke across a health system, especially in women. Targeted intervention to increase DAPT use could lead to reduced rate of short-term stroke recurrence.
Authors/Disclosures
Jonathan Solomonow, MD
PRESENTER
Dr. Solomonow has nothing to disclose.
Jamie R. Marks, PhD Dr. Marks has nothing to disclose.
Karen Yarbrough (University of Maryland Medical Center) Karen Yarbrough has nothing to disclose.
Prachi Mehndiratta, MD Dr. Mehndiratta has nothing to disclose.
Seemant Chaturvedi, MD, FAAN, FAHA (University of Maryland) Dr. Chaturvedi has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Astra Zeneca. Dr. Chaturvedi has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for University of Calgary. Dr. Chaturvedi has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as an Editor, Associate Editor, or Editorial Advisory Board Member for American Heart Association. Dr. Chaturvedi has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as an Expert Witness for Ramar & Paradiso. Dr. Chaturvedi has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as an Expert Witness for Cole, Scott, Kissane. The institution of Dr. Chaturvedi has received research support from NINDS.