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Abstract Details

Evaluating Medical Student Learning Preference and its Relationship to Clerkship Satisfaction
Education, Research, and Methodology
S10 - Utilizing Varied Modalities to Impact Learning and Make Curricular Changes (4:06 PM-4:18 PM)
004

The rise of recorded lectures, problem-based learning, and remote learning has shifted the medical education landscape. By understanding learning preferences, educators are better positioned to respond to the changing needs of students. The Learning Preference Inventory (LPI) is a validated tool that assesses preferences across 3 domains: (1) content delivery (concrete vs abstract), (2) instruction (teacher- vs student-structured), and (3) learning environment (individual vs interpersonal). 

To describe the learning preferences of medical students in the Neurology clerkship and to evaluate how preferences correlate with satisfaction with curricular elements. 

A cohort of medical students rotating through the Neurology clerkship was identified. All students completed the LPI and a survey to assess satisfaction with curricular elements, including virtual simulation, localization session, and clinical reasoning modules. 

530 medical students were included. The most common learning preferences were concrete (83%), teacher-structured (51%) and interpersonal (50%). The most common LPI profile was concrete/teacher-structured/interpersonal (27%), and the least common was abstract/teacher-structured/individual (3%). There was a significant difference in LPI responses across medical school years: more third- and fourth-year students preferred individual learning environments compared to second-year students (p = 0.012). Learning preferences did correlate with certain course satisfaction survey responses. In particular, individual learners were significantly less likely to recommend the clinical reasoning sessions than interpersonal learners (p = 0.019).  

Neurology clerkship students demonstrated clear learning preferences that were associated with satisfaction with specific curricular content. There were significant differences in learning preferences across medical school years, suggesting that learning preferences may shift throughout training and may be influenced by clinical exposure. These findings suggest that there may be value in allowing individualization of clerkship curriculum, especially for experienced students. In an educational environment that cultivates the success of all learners, the LPI provides important data to inform curricular development and achieve “precision” medical education.

Authors/Disclosures
Margo A. Peyton, MD (Margo Peyton)
PRESENTER
Dr. Peyton has nothing to disclose.
Andrew Lea Andrew Lea has nothing to disclose.
Roy E. Strowd, III, MD, FAAN (Wake Forest School Of Medicine) Dr. Strowd has received personal compensation for serving as an employee of Kaplan. Dr. Strowd has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Monteris Medical, Inc. Dr. Strowd has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Novocure. Dr. Strowd has received personal compensation in the range of $5,000-$9,999 for serving as an Editor, Associate Editor, or Editorial Advisory Board Member for American Academy of Neurology. The institution of Dr. Strowd has received research support from Southeastern Brain Tumor Foundation. The institution of Dr. Strowd has received research support from Jazz Pharmaceuticals. The institution of Dr. Strowd has received research support from National Institutes of Health. The institution of Dr. Strowd has received research support from Alpha Omega Alpha. The institution of Dr. Strowd has received research support from American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. Dr. Strowd has received publishing royalties from a publication relating to health care. Dr. Strowd has received publishing royalties from a publication relating to health care.
Rachel Marie E. Salas, MD, MEd, FAAN (Johns Hopkins) Dr. Salas has received personal compensation for serving as an employee of ScholarRx. Dr. Salas has received personal compensation for serving as an employee of HMPGlobal. Dr. Salas has received personal compensation for serving as an employee of Idorsia. Dr. Salas has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as an Editor, Associate Editor, or Editorial Advisory Board Member for Neurology Learning Network. Dr. Salas has received publishing royalties from a publication relating to health care.
Charlene Gamaldo, MD, FAAN (Johns Hopkins University) Dr. Gamaldo has received personal compensation in the range of $5,000-$9,999 for serving as a Consultant for johns hopkins. Dr. Gamaldo has received personal compensation in the range of $5,000-$9,999 for serving as a Consultant for Idorsia. The institution of Dr. Gamaldo has received research support from NIH/NIMH/NIDA/NINDS. Dr. Gamaldo has received publishing royalties from a publication relating to health care.
Doris G. Leung, MD (Kennedy Krieger Institute) The institution of Dr. Leung has received research support from US Department of Defense. The institution of Dr. Leung has received research support from Fulcrum Therapeutics. The institution of Dr. Leung has received research support from ML Bio Solutions, Inc.. The institution of Dr. Leung has received research support from Sarepta Therapeutics. The institution of Dr. Leung has received research support from Cumberland Pharmaceuticals. The institution of Dr. Leung has received research support from FibroGen Inc.. The institution of Dr. Leung has received research support from Astellas Pharma. The institution of Dr. Leung has received research support from University of Kansas Medical Center Research Institute. The institution of Dr. Leung has received research support from Pfizer, Inc.. The institution of Dr. Leung has received research support from Genethon. The institution of Dr. Leung has received research support from Harmony Biosciences. The institution of Dr. Leung has received research support from Edgewise Therapeutics.