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Abstract Details

Pilot Implementation and Evaluation of an Outpatient Teleneurology Curriculum for Medical Students
Education, Research, and Methodology
S10 - Utilizing Varied Modalities to Impact Learning and Make Curricular Changes (4:42 PM-4:54 PM)
007
Stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic, medical students rotating on neurology electives were asked to participate in telehealth encounters with limited formal teaching and evaluation on the principles and practice of teleneurology.
To assess the feasibility and outcomes for a novel teleneurology educational curriculum 
We developed a 2-week outpatient teleneurology curriculum consisting of virtual asynchronous video modules and virtual synchronous patient interactions designed to address AAMC telehealth competencies. It was delivered as a supplement to an established outpatient neurology elective for 4th year medical students from July 2021-September 2022 at a US medical school.  Participation was optional.  Assessments included pre and post student self-rated confidence in 6 telehealth competencies on a 4-point scale.  Students participated in a summative virtual visit with a neurological patient under direct observation of an attending neurologist well-versed in telehealth.  Both the observing neurologist and patient evaluated the student in the telehealth competencies. 
Twenty-six 4th year medical students participated in the pilot.  Each student spent 1 hour viewing asynchronous video modules, and had 454 ± 200.5 (mean+/-SD) minutes of virtual patient contact over 15 ± 8.2 virtual visits. After completing the curriculum, students were 92-100% moderately or very confident regarding their capabilities across telehealth competencies, representing an improvement from 12-96% compared to pre-curriculum (average increase 0.56-1.84 on the 4-point scale; p<0.005 for all competencies). Examination and regulatory competencies demonstrated the greatest improvement.  Competencies were rated as effective or very effective for 88-100% of students by patients and 92-100% of students by faculty during the summative visit.
This pilot teleneurology curriculum demonstrated that students not only increased in self-rated confidence in performing telehealth competencies, but also demonstrated meeting these competencies in the opinion of both physician and patient observers.  Further research into effective methods for integrating telehealth competencies into the neurology and broader medical school curriculum is warranted.
Authors/Disclosures
Melissa W. Ko, MD, FAAN (Indiana University Neuroscience Center)
PRESENTER
Dr. Ko has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as an Editor, Associate Editor, or Editorial Advisory Board Member for AAN. The institution of Dr. Ko has received research support from HRSA. Dr. Ko has received research support from IU Health.
Heather Moss, MD, PhD, FAAN (Spencer Center for Vision Research at Stanford) Dr. Moss has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as a Consultant for Twenty Twenty Therapeutics. Dr. Moss has received personal compensation in the range of $100,000-$499,999 for serving as a Consultant for Verana Health. Dr. Moss has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as an Editor, Associate Editor, or Editorial Advisory Board Member for Medlink Inc. Dr. Moss has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as an Expert Witness for Legal Firms. The institution of Dr. Moss has received research support from NIH. The institution of Dr. Moss has received research support from Department of Defense. The institution of Dr. Moss has received research support from Research to Prevent Blindness. Dr. Moss has received intellectual property interests from a discovery or technology relating to health care. Dr. Moss has received personal compensation in the range of $0-$499 for serving as a grant review panel with NASA. Dr. Moss has received personal compensation in the range of $0-$499 for serving as a grant review panel with National Institutes of Health. Dr. Moss has a non-compensated relationship as a Board of Directors with North American Neuro-ophthalmology Society that is relevant to AAN interests or activities.
Devin Dean Mackay, MD (Indiana University) Dr. Mackay has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as an Expert Witness for various law firms.
Paul Y. Ko, MD (Indiana University School of Medicine) Dr. Ko has nothing to disclose.
Katherine J. Chartier, PhD (Indiana University School of Medicine) Dr. Chartier has received personal compensation in the range of $50,000-$99,999 for serving as a Instructional Design Consultant, IU School of Medicine PRIME Grant with Health Resources & Services Administration.
Lindsey Jo Reese, MD Dr. Reese has nothing to disclose.
Paul M. Wallach, MD,MBBS (Indiana University School of Medicine) Dr. Wallach has nothing to disclose.
Bradley Allen, MD,PhD (Indiana University School of Medicine) The institution of Dr. Allen has received research support from AMA Accelerating Change in Medical Educaiton Program. The institution of Dr. Allen has received research support from HRSA Medical Education Program Grant.