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Abstract Details

Latinx with multiple sclerosis have greater disability and loss of deep and cortical gray matter
Multiple Sclerosis
S31 - MS Clinical Decision Making and Special Populations (3:54 PM-4:06 PM)
003

MS affects an increasing number of Latinx patients. The clinical and radiological phenotype of Latinx MS is not well understood and may have biological or social underpinnings.

To characterize clinical and MRI features of Latinx with multiple sclerosis (MS). 
A retrospective cross-sectional study in the MS PATHS network was conducted with Latinx and White non-Latinx carrying a diagnosis of MS. Brain MRI conducted within 1 year of clinical visits were included in the MRI cohort. Clinical and quantitative MRI measures were extracted from MS PATHS including age- and education-adjusted processing speed tests. Comparisons between Latinx and White subjects were conducted using two-sample t-test and Wilcoxon rank-sum. Mixed effect models were used to examine clinical and MRI differences between Latinx and White subjects while adjusting for covariates including education, insurance, and employment. 

A total of 660 Latinx and 9957 White subjects were identified with 388 Latinx and 5726 White subjects in the MRI cohort. Compared with White subjects, Latinx were younger (45.4 years [12.2] vs: 52.9 years [12.7], p <0.001), had shorter disease duration (17.2 years [19.6] vs. 19.5 years [11.5], p <0.001), and had lower processing speed z-score (-0.81 [1.3] vs.-0.40 [1.2], p <0.001). Latinx had higher T2 lesion volume (8.0 ml [IQR 3.5-16] vs 6.5 ml [IQR 3.0-14.1], p = 0.009), and lower thalamic volume (12.8 ml [1.7] vs 13.3 ml [1.6], p <0.001) compared to White subjects. Adjusted mixed models showed that Latinx subjects had lower processing speed, brain parenchymal fraction, thalamic volume, cortical volume, and deep gray matter volume (all p <0.001) as well as slower walking speed (p=0.04), non-dominant manual dexterity (<0.01), and higher PDDS (p=0.045).

Latinx, despite being younger and having a shorter disease duration than Whites, had more physical disability, cognitive dysfunction, greater lesion burden, and loss of deep and cortical gray matter.

Authors/Disclosures
Daniel Ontaneda, MD, PhD, FAAN (Cleveland Clinic)
PRESENTER
Dr. Ontaneda has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Novartis. Dr. Ontaneda has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Genentech/Roche. Dr. Ontaneda has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Biogen Idec. Dr. Ontaneda has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for Genentech/Roche. The institution of Dr. Ontaneda has received research support from NIH. The institution of Dr. Ontaneda has received research support from PCORI. The institution of Dr. Ontaneda has received research support from NMSS. The institution of Dr. Ontaneda has received research support from Genetech.
Marisa P. McGinley, DO (Cleveland Clinic) Dr. McGinley has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Octave. Dr. McGinley has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for Genentech. Dr. McGinley has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for EMD Serono. The institution of Dr. McGinley has received research support from Novartis. The institution of Dr. McGinley has received research support from Biogen. The institution of Dr. McGinley has received research support from Genentech. The institution of Dr. McGinley has received research support from NIH.
Tucker Harvey (Cleveland Clinic, LRI, Quantitative Health Sciences) Mr. Harvey has nothing to disclose.
Kathryn Fitzgerald, PhD (Johns Hopkins University) The institution of Dr. Fitzgerald has received research support from NIH. The institution of Dr. Fitzgerald has received research support from National MS Society.
Ellen M. Mowry, MD, FAAN (Johns Hopkins University) Dr. Mowry has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for BeCareLink, LLC. The institution of Dr. Mowry has received research support from Biogen. The institution of Dr. Mowry has received research support from Genentech. Dr. Mowry has received publishing royalties from a publication relating to health care.
Jeffrey Alan Cohen, MD (Cleveland Clinic) Dr. Cohen has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as a Consultant for Convelo. Dr. Cohen has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Mylan. Dr. Cohen has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Biogen. Dr. Cohen has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for PSI. Dr. Cohen has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for EMD Serono. Dr. Cohen has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Gossamer Bio. Dr. Cohen has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as an Editor, Associate Editor, or Editorial Advisory Board Member for Sage.
Farren Briggs, PhD (University of Miami Miller School of Medicine) The institution of Prof. Briggs has received research support from NIH. The institution of Prof. Briggs has received research support from Michael J. Fox Foundation.