Log In

Forgot Password?

OR

Not a member? Continue as a nonmember.

Become a Member

By becoming a member of the AAN, you can receive exclusive information to help you at every stage of your career. Benefits include:

Join Now See All Benefits

Loading... please wait

Abstract Details

Automated Detection of Central-positive Complexes & Postictal Generalized EEG Suppression in ECT-induced Seizures – An Illustrative Case Report
Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG)
P10 - Poster Session 10 (8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
9-009
Generalized seizures induced by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) have been proposed as a model to study epileptic seizures in humans. We recently described generalized, high-amplitude waveforms with maximum positive voltage over the vertex (CPCs) during ECT-induced seizures. Furthermore, we developed an automated algorithm for detecting postictal PGES, defined as electroencephalographic (EEG) activity of ≤10 mV following a generalized seizure. 
We present a case of using automated algorithms to analyze central-positive complexes (CPCs) and postictal generalized electroencephalographic suppression (PGES) in the context of ECT-induced seizures. Our goal is to characterize peri-ictal EEG changes in ECT-induced seizures to define their unique features as generalized seizures.
This investigation is a secondary analysis of data collected from Reconstructing Consciousness and Cognition Phase 2 study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02761330). A 53-year-old female with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder underwent 5 sessions of right unilateral ECT during concurrent 64-channel EEG recordings. Quantitative EEG analysis allowed for assessment of spatiotemporal properties and spectral content during the peri-ictal period. CPC and PGES durations, quantified by automated algorithms, were compared to those derived through visual interpretation by expert epileptologists.
CPCs occurred during Phase III of all recorded seizures, with a median duration of 41 seconds. CPC evolved from 4.1 to 3.2 Hz as the seizures progressed. Peak-amplitude CPC scalp topology was consistent across patient’s seizures, showing maximal positive polarity over the vertex and surrounding regions and maximal negative polarity over the subocular electrodes. PGES duration lasted 5-45 seconds (median of 22 seconds) following the seizure and the median time to responsiveness after the seizure was 18.3 minutes. The findings using the automated algorithm were comparable to manual visual interpretation.
This case presents the utility of automated algorithms to analyze CPCs and PGES characteristics, many of which were comparable to those evaluated through visual EEG interpretation.
Authors/Disclosures
Chetan Nayak, MD (University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston)
PRESENTER
Dr. Nayak has nothing to disclose.
Mohammad Mehdi Kafashan, PhD (Washington University in St. Louis) Dr. Kafashan has nothing to disclose.
Fabio Nascimento, MD (Washington University Medical School) Dr. Nascimento has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Zogenix. The institution of Dr. Nascimento has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for Biocodex. Dr. Nascimento has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as an Editor, Associate Editor, or Editorial Advisory Board Member for AAN. Dr. Nascimento has received publishing royalties from a publication relating to health care. Dr. Nascimento has a non-compensated relationship as a Editorial Team Member with Neurology RFS that is relevant to AAN interests or activities. Dr. Nascimento has a non-compensated relationship as a Production Team with Neurology Podcast that is relevant to AAN interests or activities.
Ben Julian Agustin Palanca, MD,PhD (Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis) The institution of Dr. Palanca has received research support from National Institutes of Health. The institution of Dr. Palanca has received research support from McDonnell Center for Systems Neuroscience. The institution of Dr. Palanca has received research support from American Federation for Suicide Prevention. Dr. Palanca has received intellectual property interests from a discovery or technology relating to health care. Dr. Palanca has received personal compensation in the range of $100,000-$499,999 for serving as a Employee with Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
Robert E. Hogan, MD (Washington Univ in St Louis/Neuro Dept) Dr. Hogan has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Neurelis. The institution of Dr. Hogan has received research support from Biogen Inc. The institution of Dr. Hogan has received research support from Engage Therapeutics. The institution of Dr. Hogan has received research support from Otsuka Pharmaceuticals. The institution of Dr. Hogan has received research support from Cerevel Therapeutics.