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Abstract Details

Can a Single Acute Ischemic Stroke Simulation Course Facilitate Mastery?
Education, Research, and Methodology
P9 - Poster Session 9 (5:30 PM-6:30 PM)
15-001

Previous studies have demonstrated that simulation can promote mastery learning in non-stroke neurological emergencies.

To assess the impact of an acute ischemic stroke (AIS) simulation course on residents’ performance, confidence, and knowledge.

We designed an AIS simulation course with three independent scenarios based on previously reported consensus. For each scenario a Minimum Passing Score (MPS) and Mastery Score (MS) was determined by the Angoff method. Thirteen junior neurology residents completed a 20-point knowledge test and 7-point Likert scale confidence survey about AIS before the course and after didactic teaching. A week later, each resident participated in a scored AIS case and then practiced stroke care in second unscored case. Residents again completed the knowledge and confidence assessments. Several weeks later, without notice, each resident was evaluated in a third AIS scenario. 

 

For comparison, eight senior residents completed the knowledge test, confidence survey, and the third acute stroke case. 

 

Pre-post and between groups comparisons were conducted using paired t-tests and independent t-tests, respectively.

Junior residents scored better on the knowledge test after the didactic session (mean score pre: 40% to post: 52.2%, p<0.05), but only 3 (23%) initially achieved the MPS score in the first AIS simulation. After the simulation course, 9 junior residents (69%) achieved the MPS threshold. Although none achieved Mastery, junior residents’ mean score in the simulation improved (10.3 (SD=2.8) vs 15.7 (SD=2.6), p<0.001) and their confidence increased (pre mean=3.3 (SD=1.9) vs. post mean =4.9 (SD=1.2), p< 0.001). 

 

Eight seniors completed the simulation: five reached MPS (63%) and one achieved Mastery. The simulation scores of the post-course juniors and seniors were similar (mean=15.7 (SD=2.6) vs mean=16.0 (SD=2.5), p=0.793).

This pilot study suggests that a brief AIS simulation course may improves junior residents’ performance and confidence to a level similar to senior residents, but not to mastery.

Authors/Disclosures
Casey S.W. Albin, MD (Emory Healthcare)
PRESENTER
Dr. Albin has received personal compensation in the range of $0-$499 for serving as a Consultant for Azurity Pharmaceutical. Dr. Albin has received personal compensation in the range of $5,000-$9,999 for serving as an Editor, Associate Editor, or Editorial Advisory Board Member for Continuum: Life Long Learning in Neurology. Dr. Albin has received research support from American Academy of Neurology. Dr. Albin has received publishing royalties from a publication relating to health care. Dr. Albin has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Instructor with Resuscitation Leadership Academy.
Erika Sigman, MD Dr. Sigman has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as an Editor, Associate Editor, or Editorial Advisory Board Member for Journal of Clinical Neuroscience.
Melissa Betts Pergakis, MD Dr. Pergakis has nothing to disclose.
Nirav R. Bhatt, MD (University of Pittsburgh) Dr. Bhatt has nothing to disclose.
Spencer Hutto, MD (Emory University: Neurology Residency Program) Dr. Hutto has nothing to disclose.
Sitara Koneru, MD Dr. Koneru has nothing to disclose.
Ehizele Osehobo, MD, MSc (Emory Brain Health Center) Dr. Osehobo has nothing to disclose.
Joaquin Augusto Vizcarra, MD (Emory University) Dr. Vizcarra has nothing to disclose.
Nicholas Allen Morris, MD, FAAN (University of Maryland Medical Center) The institution of Dr. Morris has received research support from UMB ICTR through NIH NCATS&CTSA grant 1UL1TR003098. The institution of Dr. Morris has received research support from University of Maryland Medical Center. The institution of Dr. Morris has received research support from National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Dr. Morris has received personal compensation in the range of $0-$499 for serving as a Grand Rounds Speaker with New York University. Dr. Morris has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Grand Rounds Speaker with Mount Sinai Health System. Dr. Morris has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Continuum Article Author with American Academy of Neurology. Dr. Morris has received personal compensation in the range of $0-$499 for serving as a Reviewer with Society of Critical Care Medicine. Dr. Morris has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Grand Rounds Speaker with New York Medical College.