Log In

Forgot Password?

OR

Not a member? Continue as a nonmember.

Become a Member

By becoming a member of the AAN, you can receive exclusive information to help you at every stage of your career. Benefits include:

Join Now See All Benefits

Loading... please wait

Abstract Details

Serum Neurofilament Light Chain Levels as a Biomarker of Disease Activity and Treatment Response in Patients with Progressive and Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis
Multiple Sclerosis
P1 - Poster Session 1 (8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
3-009

NfL is a less costly, blood-based biomarker suitable for the longitudinal monitoring of disease status and response to treatment. NfL levels in the CSF and blood are reflecting the degree of axonal damage in MS.

To assess the value of serum neurofilament light chain (NfL) as a biomarker of disease activity and treatment response in Western Australian patients with multiple sclerosis (MS).

Serum NfL levels were measured in 542 patients with demyelinating disease, using single-molecule array technology (SIMOA).  Treatment strategies were classified as “no treatment”, “injectable” and “high efficacy”. The Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score and patients’ demographics were also analysed. 

Higher levels of NfL were associated with higher levels of disability. There was a statistically significant difference in NfL levels between early disease (CIS/RRMS) and progressive disease (PPMS/SPMS), without treatment (35.2 ± 4.5 vs 42.0 ± 3.9, p<0.01, adjusted for age). Therapy significantly reduced NfL levels in RRMS compared to “no treatment” (24.4 ± 1.3 vs 36.9 ± 5.1, p<0.01, adjusted for age). Both “injectable” and “high efficacy” therapies reduced serum NfL levels in RRMS patients, however, a statistically significant difference was noted only with “high efficacy” treatments (23.3 ± 1.5 vs 36.9 ±5.1). 

Our findings support the potential value of serum NfL as a measure of disease activity and treatment response in multiple sclerosis. 

Authors/Disclosures
Marzena Pedrini, PhD (Perron Institute for Neurological and Translational Science)
PRESENTER
Dr. Pedrini has nothing to disclose.
Belinda Kaskow, PhD Dr. Kaskow has nothing to disclose.
Stephanie Trend, PhD The institution of Dr. Trend has received research support from MS Australia.
William *use 123100 Carroll William *use 123100 Carroll has received personal compensation in the range of $0-$499 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for Roche. William *use 123100 Carroll has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving on a Speakers Bureau for Biogen. William *use 123100 Carroll has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving on a Speakers Bureau for Merck.
Susan Walters Susan Walters has nothing to disclose.
Aleksandra Maleska Maceski Aleksandra Maleska Maceski has nothing to disclose.
Jens Kuhle, MD Dr. Kuhle has nothing to disclose.
Allan G. Kermode, MD,FRACP,MBBS (SJOG Clinic, Suite 314) Dr. Kermode has received personal compensation in the range of $0-$499 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for Biogen. Dr. Kermode has received personal compensation in the range of $0-$499 for serving on a Speakers Bureau for Roche.