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Abstract Details

Loss of gyrification is associated with disability progression in multiple sclerosis
Multiple Sclerosis
P10 - Poster Session 10 (8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
3-006
Local gyrification index (LGI) is a measure of the degree and pattern of cortical folding and is associated with worsening disability in neurodegenerative diseases, but is not always correlated with brain or cortical atrophy. In MS, changes in LGI may indicate regions undergoing remodeling.

Examine longitudinal changes in cortical gyrification in multiple sclerosis (MS) and the link between cortical reshaping, lesion load, and disability.

47 people with MS (29 relapsing-remitting, 15 secondary progressive, 3 primary progressive; age 49±11 years; 65% female; median disease duration 12 years [IQR, 17.5]) underwent longitudinal 3T and 7T brain MRI and disability assessments (median follow-up 2.3 years, range 1.7–4.0). Cortical and white matter lesions were manually segmented on 7T (0.5mm3 MP2RAGE (median of 4 acquisitions), 0.5mm3 T2*w GRE) and 3T (FLAIR, MP2RAGE, T2w) images respectively. LGI was measured at each timepoint on 3T MP2RAGE T1w images (Freesurfer 7.1).

Across the cohort, LGI decreased over time in the cingulate, superior frontal, and medial orbitofrontal gyri (PFWE<0.05, adjusted for age and sex). Within individual cortical regions, correlation between change in LGI and change in cortical thickness and volume was weak to moderate. The number of cortical areas with ≥5% LGI reduction was associated with worsening timed 25-foot walk (ρ=0.302, P=0.039) and 9-hole peg test (ρ=0.361, P=0.013). Global gyrification decrease was associated with higher cortical (ρ=-0.296, P=0.043) and white matter lesion burden (ρ=-0.303, P=0.039). An age-adjusted backward regression model used to determine the influence of baseline cortical and white matter lesion load on LGI changes predicted 16.2% of LGI variance (P=0.001), and higher cortical lesion burden predicted gyrification loss (β=-0.403, P=0.005).

Loss of gyrification is associated with worsening disability and lesion burden, especially in the cortex. Further investigation of LGI in MS may elucidate the factors influencing cortical remodeling and how cortical remodeling contributes to disability.


Authors/Disclosures
Jonadab Dos Santos Silva (Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai)
PRESENTER
Mr. Dos Santos Silva has nothing to disclose.
Francesco La Rosa, PhD Dr. La Rosa has nothing to disclose.
William Andrew Mullins, Other Mr. Mullins has nothing to disclose.
Prasanna Parvathaneni, PhD Dr. Parvathaneni has nothing to disclose.
Josefina Maranzano (McGill University, Montreal Neurological Institute) The institution of Ms. Maranzano has received research support from Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.
Daniel Reich, MD,PhD (National Institutes of Health, Neuroimmunology Branch, NINDS) Dr. Reich has received research support from NIH. The institution of Dr. Reich has received research support from Adelson Medical Research Foundation. The institution of Dr. Reich has received research support from Sanofi-Genzyme. The institution of Dr. Reich has received research support from Abata Therapeutics. The institution of Dr. Reich has received research support from National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Dr. Reich has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a CME Faculty with PeerView. Dr. Reich has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a CME Faculty with AcademicCME. Dr. Reich has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a CME Faculty with Integrity. Dr. Reich has a non-compensated relationship as a Advisor with Sanofi-Genzyme that is relevant to AAN interests or activities. Dr. Reich has a non-compensated relationship as a Board of Directors with ACTRIMS that is relevant to AAN interests or activities. Dr. Reich has a non-compensated relationship as a Advisor with Abata Therapeutics that is relevant to AAN interests or activities. Dr. Reich has a non-compensated relationship as a Advisor with American Brain Foundation that is relevant to AAN interests or activities. Dr. Reich has a non-compensated relationship as a Advisor with University of Basel RC2NB that is relevant to AAN interests or activities. Dr. Reich has a non-compensated relationship as a Advisor with Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada that is relevant to AAN interests or activities. Dr. Reich has a non-compensated relationship as a Advisor with Tuscan Doctorate in Neuroscience that is relevant to AAN interests or activities. Dr. Reich has a non-compensated relationship as a Editorial Board with Multiple Sclerosis Journal that is relevant to AAN interests or activities. Dr. Reich has a non-compensated relationship as a Advisor with Biohaven that is relevant to AAN interests or activities. Dr. Reich has a non-compensated relationship as a Advisor with Sana that is relevant to AAN interests or activities. Dr. Reich has a non-compensated relationship as a Advisor with Merck KGaA EMD Serono that is relevant to AAN interests or activities. Dr. Reich has a non-compensated relationship as a Advisor with Bristol-Meyers Squibb that is relevant to AAN interests or activities. Dr. Reich has a non-compensated relationship as a Advisor with ChemoCentryx that is relevant to AAN interests or activities. Dr. Reich has a non-compensated relationship as a Collaborator, Advisor with Hyperfine that is relevant to AAN interests or activities. Dr. Reich has a non-compensated relationship as a Collaborator with Imaginab that is relevant to AAN interests or activities. Dr. Reich has a non-compensated relationship as a Advisor with Perceptive that is relevant to AAN interests or activities. Dr. Reich has a non-compensated relationship as a Collaborator with Annexon that is relevant to AAN interests or activities. Dr. Reich has a non-compensated relationship as a Collaborator, Advisor with Philips that is relevant to AAN interests or activities. Dr. Reich has a non-compensated relationship as a Collaborator with Siemens that is relevant to AAN interests or activities.
Erin Savner Beck, MD (Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai) The institution of Dr. Beck has received research support from National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Dr. Beck has received intellectual property interests from a discovery or technology relating to health care.