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Abstract Details

Osmotic Demyelinating Syndrome Secondary to Breast Cancer Chemotherapy: a Case Report
Autoimmune Neurology
P10 - Poster Session 10 (8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
6-024

ODS comprises both central pontine demyelination and extrapontine myelinolysis. This condition accounts for 0.4% to 0.56% of neurological admissions to tertiary referral hospitals and 0.06% of medical admissions. Although rapid correction of hyponatremia is the most common cause, other etiologies such as alcohol consumption, chronic renal failure, and organ transplantation are also reported. Chemotherapy can be an infrequent cause of this condition. Here we describe a case of ODS in a normonatremic patient in treatment with trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and docetaxel. 


To report a case of osmotic demyelinating syndrome (ODS) secondary to chemotherapy for breast cancer. 


 Not applicable.
A 71-year-old female with a history of breast cancer, with lung and brain metastases, is seen in the emergency room due to a decline in her functionality over the past three months, following the initiation of chemotherapy treatment with trastuzumab, pertuzumab and docetaxel. On neurological examination, she exhibited cognitive failures and a non-fluent aphasia without focal neurologic signs. In addition, right-sided focal seizures successfully managed with levetiracetam. On neuroimaging, there were signs of pontine myelinolysis and a reduction in the size of previous brain metastatic lesions. After discontinuing chemotherapy, the patient's speech and gait significantly improved.

 ODS could be associated with combination chemotherapy treatment in the setting of a normonatremic patient. In 2014, Sungjae Lee and colleagues reported a similar case in a patient with colon cancer who received 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and leucovorin chemotherapy. In another study published by Cortes and colleagues, the development of osmotic demyelinating syndrome when using a combination of trastuzumab and pertuzumab for breast cancer was reported as a rare finding (one case of twenty-nine patients). To our knowledge, this is one of the first cases describing an ODS following therapy with pertuzumab, trastuzumab, and docetaxel.


Authors/Disclosures
Jairo Alejandro Gaitan Alfonso, MD (Fundación Santa Fe de Bogotá)
PRESENTER
Dr. Gaitan Alfonso has nothing to disclose.
Saul Reyes, MD (The Royal London Hospital) Dr. Reyes has received personal compensation in the range of $0-$499 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for Merck. Dr. Reyes has received personal compensation in the range of $0-$499 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for Roche. Dr. Reyes has received personal compensation in the range of $0-$499 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for BIIB. Dr. Reyes has received personal compensation in the range of $0-$499 for serving on a Speakers Bureau for Merck. Dr. Reyes has received personal compensation in the range of $0-$499 for serving on a Speakers Bureau for Novartis. Dr. Reyes has received personal compensation in the range of $0-$499 for serving on a Speakers Bureau for Biogen.
Daniela Sofia Rodriguez (Fundación Santafé) Ms. Rodriguez has nothing to disclose.
Vanessa Salej, MD Dr. Salej has nothing to disclose.
Jorge M. Otero, MD (Fundacion Santa Fe de Bogota) Dr. Otero has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for GSK. Dr. Otero has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for Janssen . Dr. Otero has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as an officer or member of the Board of Directors for FICMAC.
Jaime Toro, MD, FAAN (Universidad El Bosque) Dr. Toro has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as an Editor, Associate Editor, or Editorial Advisory Board Member for Watch Neurology .