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Abstract Details

Association of Alzheimer’s Plasma Biomarker Concentrations with Body Mass Index in Older Adults
Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology
P10 - Poster Session 10 (8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
7-005

Studies suggest that comorbidities may influence the levels of blood-based biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease and their interpretation; however, these relationships must be further explored in ethnically diverse cohorts. In our recent multi-ethnic cohort study, 47% of cognitively impaired participants had low P-tau concentrations, and 31% of unimpaired participants had high P-tau concentrations. We sought to determine whether differences in risk factor profiles may help to explain the discordant groups in the same cohort.

To evaluate the relationship of chronic medical conditions and other characteristics, including body mass index (BMI), vascular risk factors, depression, head injury and education, with cognitive impairment and blood-based biomarkers of Alzheimer’s pathology, phosphorylated tau (P-tau 181, P-tau 217), in a multi-ethnic cohort.

Three hundred participants aged 65 and older were selected from a prospective community-based cohort for equal representation among three racial/ethnic groups: non-Hispanic White, Hispanic/Latino and African American/Black. Participants were classified into four diagnostic groups based on absence (Asym)/ presence (Sym) of cognitive symptoms and low(-)/high(+) P-tau, determined in the same cohort: (Asym/P-tau-, Asym/P-tau+, Sym/P-tau-, Sym/P-tau). We examined differences in participant characteristics across the four groups. For significant factors, we also examined two-group differences according to cognitive symptoms (Asym/Sym) and P-tau (P-tau+/P-tau-).
BMI was lower in individuals with high P-tau 217 and 181 concentrations (25.7 vs. 27.9 kg/m2; 25.3 vs. 27.9 kg/m2, respectively) but did not differ across dementia groups. Education was lower in individuals with dementia compared to those without (9.1 vs. 12.5 years), and it did not vary according to P-tau level. Frequencies of hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, smoking, head injury and depression did not differ between the four groups.
Lower BMI is associated with higher P-tau concentrations but not with the presence or absence of dementia. This finding suggests that Alzheimer’s pathology may be accompanied by metabolic changes regardless of cognitive status.
Authors/Disclosures
Serena Surina Hoost
PRESENTER
Ms. Hoost has nothing to disclose.
Adam Brickman, PhD Adam Brickman, PhD has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Cognition Therapeutics.
Annie Lee No disclosure on file
Yian Gu, PhD The institution of Dr. Gu has received research support from NIH.
Danurys Sanchez (Columbia University) Ms. Sanchez has nothing to disclose.
Dolly Reyes-Dumeyer, Other (Columbia University) Mrs. Reyes-Dumeyer has nothing to disclose.
Lawrence S. Honig, MD, PhD, FAAN (Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians & Surgeons) Dr. Honig has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Eisai. Dr. Honig has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Biogen. Dr. Honig has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Medscape. Dr. Honig has received personal compensation in the range of $5,000-$9,999 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for Prevail. Dr. Honig has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for Cortexyme. Dr. Honig has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as an Expert Witness for Legal Firms . The institution of Dr. Honig has received research support from Roche. The institution of Dr. Honig has received research support from Eisau. Dr. Honig has received research support from Alector. The institution of Dr. Honig has received research support from Transposon.
Jennifer J. Manly, PhD (Columbia University) The institution of Dr. Manly has received research support from NIH. Dr. Manly has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as a Consultant with University of Mississippi.
Rafeal Lantigua No disclosure on file
Min Suk Kang, PhD (Columbia University Medical Center) Dr. Kang has nothing to disclose.
Jeffrey Dage, PhD (Indiana University School of Medicine) Dr. Dage has received personal compensation for serving as an employee of Eli Lilly and Company. Dr. Dage has stock in Eli Lilly and Company. Dr. Dage has stock in General Electric. Dr. Dage has received research support from Indiana University School Of Medicine. Dr. Dage has received intellectual property interests from a discovery or technology relating to health care.
Richard P. Mayeux, MD, MSc, FAAN (The Neurological Institute, Columbia University Medical Center) Dr. Mayeux has nothing to disclose.