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Abstract Details

Recognizing Neuropathic Pain as a Symptom of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease that impacts Quality of Life
Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG)
P14 - Poster Session 14 (11:45 AM-12:45 PM)
10-005
CMT is the most commonly inherited neurological disorder, with a prevalence of 1/2,500. With no definitive cure or approved pharmacologic options, treatment focuses on rehabilitation and psychosocial support.
This study utilizes patient-reported data to explore under-recognized contributors to disease burden in Charcot-Marie Tooth (CMT) disease. The goal of this study is to evaluate the psychosocial impact of pain on patients with CMT.
Adults with CMT (n=224) participated in a mobile survey consisting of questions assessing pain quality and psychosocial factors. Validated PROMIS? scales generated T-scores describing the degree of neuropathic pain, life satisfaction, and social isolation. Statistical analysis included Pearson’s product-moment correlation and Wilcoxon rank sum tests.
A majority of respondents (81.6%) reported pain in the past 7 days, with a mean (SD) severity of 4.2±2.5 out of 10. Females aged <65 scored highest on the pain scale (5.01±2.45) and males aged >65 scored lowest (3.22±2.56). The majority of respondents experienced neuropathic-type pain (63.95%). Life satisfaction and social isolation scores among this population did not significantly differ from the general public, but pain significantly impacted patient-reported quality of life scores. Life satisfaction scores decreased with increasing pain severity (r=-0.253, p=0.00059). Social isolation was correlated with pain severity (r=0.167, p=0.02597). Compared to patients with non-neuropathic pain, patients with neuropathic pain reported increased social isolation (p=0.005967) and decreased life satisfaction (p=0.03558).

These patient-reported data reveal neuropathic pain as a contributor to disease burden in patients with CMT. Our findings suggesting that patients with severe, neuropathic-type pain experience heightened social isolation and diminished life satisfaction indicate that pain may be an unmet target in improving quality of life in patients with CMT.

 

Note: The first 2 authors contributed equally to this work.

Authors/Disclosures
Catherine W. Imossi
PRESENTER
Ms. Imossi has nothing to disclose.
Seo Youn Chang Miss Chang has nothing to disclose.
No disclosure on file
No disclosure on file
No disclosure on file
No disclosure on file
Florian P. Thomas, MD, PhD, MA, FAAN (Hackensack University Medical Center) Dr. Thomas has received personal compensation for serving as an employee of Hackensack Meridian Health. Dr. Thomas has received personal compensation in the range of $5,000-$9,999 for serving as a Consultant for Pharnext. Dr. Thomas has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as an Editor, Associate Editor, or Editorial Advisory Board Member for Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine. Dr. Thomas has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as an Expert Witness for Gravel & Shae. The institution of Dr. Thomas has received research support from University of Pennsylavania. Dr. Thomas has a non-compensated relationship as a Board Member, Metro New Jersey with National MS Society that is relevant to AAN interests or activities. Dr. Thomas has a non-compensated relationship as a Board Member with American Paraplegia Society that is relevant to AAN interests or activities.