Log In

Forgot Password?

OR

Not a member? Continue as a nonmember.

Become a Member

By becoming a member of the AAN, you can receive exclusive information to help you at every stage of your career. Benefits include:

Join Now See All Benefits

Loading... please wait

Abstract Details

Relationship Between Maternal Antibodies to Fetal Brain and Prenatal Stress Exposure in Autism Spectrum Disorder
Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology
P10 - Poster Session 10 (8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
4-002
Environmental and genetic factors contribute to the etiology of ASD, but their interaction is less well understood. Mothers that are genetically more stress susceptible have been found to be at increased risk of having a child with ASD after exposure to stress during pregnancy. Additionally, presence of maternal antibodies to fetal brain are associated with a diagnosis of ASD in the child. However, the relationship between prenatal stress exposure and maternal antibodies in mothers of children diagnosed with ASD has not yet been addressed. 
To examine the relationship between prenatal stress exposure and maternal antibodies in mothers of children diagnosed with ASD.
This exploratory study examined the association of maternal antibody response with prenatal stress and a diagnosis of ASD in the child. Blood samples from 53 mothers who have at least one child diagnosed with ASD were examined by ELISA. Maternal antibody presence, perceived stress level during pregnancy (high or low), and maternal 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms were examined for their interrelationship in ASD.  
While a high incidence of prenatal stress and maternal antibodies was found in the sample, they were not associated with each other (p=0.709, Cramer’s V=0.051). Furthermore, results revealed no significant association between maternal antibody presence and the interaction between 5-HTTLPR genotype and stress (p=0.729, Cramer’s V=0.157).  

Prenatal stress was not found to be associated with presence of maternal antibodies in the context of ASD. Despite the known relationship between stress and changes in immune function, these results suggest that prenatal stress and immune dysregulation are independently associated with a diagnosis of ASD in this study population, rather than acting through a convergent mechanism. 

Authors/Disclosures
David Q. Beversdorf, MD, FAAN (University of Missouri)
PRESENTER
Dr. Beversdorf has received personal compensation in the range of $0-$499 for serving as a Consultant for Yamo pharmaceuticals. Dr. Beversdorf has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Human Biosciences. Dr. Beversdorf has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Impel Neuropharma. Dr. Beversdorf has received personal compensation in the range of $0-$499 for serving as a Consultant for Stalicla. Dr. Beversdorf has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Scioto. Dr. Beversdorf has received personal compensation in the range of $5,000-$9,999 for serving as an Editor, Associate Editor, or Editorial Advisory Board Member for Elsevier (Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders). The institution of Dr. Beversdorf has received research support from BionexusKC. The institution of Dr. Beversdorf has received research support from Autism Research Institute. Dr. Beversdorf has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as a Case Consultant with Best Doctors.
Amy Costa Ms. Costa has nothing to disclose.
Bradley Ferguson Bradley Ferguson has received research support from United States Department of Defense.
Emily Hawkins Miss Hawkins has nothing to disclose.
Adriana Coman Adriana Coman has nothing to disclose.
Joseph Schauer, Other (UC Davis) Mr. Schauer has nothing to disclose.
Alex Ramierez-Celis No disclosure on file
Patrick Hecht, PhD (Avanir Pharmaceuticals) Dr. Hecht has received personal compensation for serving as an employee of AbbVie. Dr. Hecht has stock in AbbVie.
Danielle Bruce No disclosure on file
Michael Tilley No disclosure on file
Zohreh Talebizadeh, PhD (ACMG) Dr. Talebizadeh has nothing to disclose.
Judy Van De Water (UC Davis) Judy Van De Water has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for MARAbio. Judy Van De Water has stock in MARAbio. Judy Van De Water has received intellectual property interests from a discovery or technology relating to health care.