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Abstract Details

Randomized, waitlist-controlled trial of KICK OUT PD: Parkinson’s Disease-specific karate yields high adherence and improved quality of life
Movement Disorders
P1 - Poster Session 1 (8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
5-005
Karate is a group-based martial art incorporating aerobic, strength, resistance, and mindfulness training, each of which individually confer benefits for individuals with PD. In our pilot of twice weekly, PD-specific karate classes (KICK OUT PD), we demonstrated high retention (79%), adherence (87%), and 18% improvement in quality of life over ten weeks, p = 0.01). To rigorously test these findings, we designed a six-month, randomized, waitlist-controlled trial.
To test the efficacy and sustainability of twice-weekly karate classes designed for individuals with mild to moderate Parkinson’s Disease (PD) on quality of life and individual goal attainment over six months and maintenance of karate practice at 12 months compared to individuals randomized to a waitlist.
We recruited and 1:1 randomized individuals with Hoehn & Yahr (HY) stages 1-3 PD to six months of twice weekly, 60-minute, no-cost, PD-specific karate classes or a waitlist control. We gathered baseline demographics, quality of life, and individual participation goals. We assessed adherence (% class attendance), quality of life, and goal attainment at six months. Finally, we assessed continued karate practice in the active group at 12 months.
We randomized 52 individuals (mean age: 65.7 years, 61.5% male, mean PD duration: 7.8 years, 88.5% HY 2). Mean attendance was 92.5% and active participants experienced a clinically significant improvement in quality of life (PDQ-8 within-group change: 24.2 vs. 15.0, p = 0.002) while the waitlist control group did not change (p = 0.12). Among active participants, 84% achieved their Individual goal and 63% continued karate classes of their own accord at 12 months. 
In this randomized, controlled trial, six months of karate for PD improved quality of life and was met with remarkable adherence and sustained 12-month participation. Future investigations into this promising exercise modality are indicated. 
Authors/Disclosures
Joshua Chodosh, MD (NYU Langone Health)
PRESENTER
The institution of Dr. Chodosh has received research support from NIH-NIA. The institution of Dr. Chodosh has received research support from NIH-NIMHD. The institution of Dr. Chodosh has received research support from NIH-NINR. The institution of Dr. Chodosh has received research support from SCAN Health Plan. The institution of Dr. Chodosh has received research support from New York State Department of Health.
Jori Fleisher, MD, MSCE, FAAN (Rush University Parkinson'S and Movement Disorders Program) The institution of Dr. Fleisher has received research support from Parkinson's Foundation. The institution of Dr. Fleisher has received research support from NIH/NINDS. The institution of Dr. Fleisher has received research support from NIH/NINDS. The institution of Dr. Fleisher has received research support from NIH/NIA/Emory Roybal Center for Dementia Caregiving Mastery. Dr. Fleisher has received publishing royalties from a publication relating to health care. Dr. Fleisher has received personal compensation in the range of $0-$499 for serving as a Speaker with Parkinson's Foundation. Dr. Fleisher has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Speaker with Lewy Body Dementia Association. Dr. Fleisher has received personal compensation in the range of $0-$499 for serving as a Speaker with Davis Phinney Foundation. Dr. Fleisher has a non-compensated relationship as a Editorial Board Member with AAN Brain & Life Magazine that is relevant to AAN interests or activities.
Katheryn Woo, Other (Rush University Medical Center) Miss Woo has nothing to disclose.
Brianna Jean Sennott, MD (Rush University Medical Center) An immediate family member of Dr. Sennott has received personal compensation for serving as an employee of Abbott Laboratories.
Joan O'Keefe Joan O'Keefe has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Avexis, Inc.
Chandler Gill, MD (Rush University Medical Center) Dr. Gill has nothing to disclose.
Sharlet Anderson, PhD (Rush University Medical Center) Dr. Anderson has nothing to disclose.
Nicollette Purcell No disclosure on file
Bichum Ouyang The institution of Bichum Ouyang has received research support from NIH.