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Abstract Details

Cyst Formation following DBS Electrode Placement: A Rare Complication
Movement Disorders
P5 - Poster Session 5 (11:45 AM-12:45 PM)
5-011
Formation of an intraparenchymal cyst following DBS electrode placement is a very rare complication. Only a few case reports exist and as a result, there is paucity of knowledge on its etiology, pathogenesis, prevention and treatment.  
To present two cases of intraparenchymal cysts, a rare complication of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in patients with movement disorders. 
A chart review was done on two cases that had intraparenchymal cyst formation following DBS electrode placement at our medical center. In addition, we reviewed the literature to compare with our cases.  
Patient A is a 79 y.o. male who underwent a left VIM thalamic lead placement and Patient B is a 64 y.o. underwent bilateral VIM lead placement for essential tremor. Both patients had a period of improvement in tremor before starting to experience new neurological deficits about 10 months and 2 months after lead placement, respectively. Patient A experienced right foot weakness, right arm weakness, and subjective decline in cognition while Patient B experienced an acute episode of altered mental status in the emergency department while under cardiac monitoring. Upon imaging, a cyst was found at the tip of the DBS lead in Patient A’s left thalamus and Patient B’s right thalamus. Infectious workup was negative indicating the cysts to be non-infectious. The brain electrodes were removed in both patients with resolution of neurological deficits and cyst regression on repeat imaging. Patient A continued to have tremor suppression for a year despite electrode removal while Patient B had an immediate tremor return to the pre-DBS baseline.  
Electrode explanation resulted in cyst regression with resolution of right hemi-body weakness in Patient A and altered mental status in Patient B. There is a need for reporting this very rare complication of DBS surgery to better understand its etiology, pathogenesis, treatment and prognosis.  
Authors/Disclosures
Mustafa S. Siddiqui, MD, FAAN
PRESENTER
Dr. Siddiqui has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as a Consultant for Boston Scientific Neuromodulation. Dr. Siddiqui has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for Abbvie. Dr. Siddiqui has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as an Expert Witness for United States Department of Justice. The institution of Dr. Siddiqui has received research support from Boston Scientific Neuromodulation. The institution of Dr. Siddiqui has received research support from Abbvie. Dr. Siddiqui has received research support from Michael J. Fox Foundation. The institution of Dr. Siddiqui has received research support from National Institute of Health .
Su Htet Htet Naing, MD (University of California, Davis) Ms. Naing has nothing to disclose.
Sidish Venkataraman, MD Dr. Venkataraman has nothing to disclose.
Stephen B. Tatter, MD (Wake Forest Univ School of Medicine) The institution of Dr. Tatter has received research support from Monteris Medical, Inc. The institution of Dr. Tatter has received research support from Arbor Pharmaceuticals. Dr. Tatter has received intellectual property interests from a discovery or technology relating to health care.
Adrian Laxton Adrian Laxton has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Monteris. Adrian Laxton has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for Monteris .