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Abstract Details

Patient perceptions and knowledge of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson’s disease (PD) (KNOW-DBS)
Movement Disorders
P5 - Poster Session 5 (11:45 AM-12:45 PM)
5-015

DBS is a safe and effective treatment for patients with advancing PD with motor fluctuations and dyskinesia. However, the surgical decision making involves a multistep complex process. In spite of adequate counseling by the neuromodulation team, patients may still experience confusion about this intricate therapy. Revealing those existing knowledge gaps is vital to improve patient understanding of this therapy with device self-adjustment alongside medical management.  

Identify existing knowledge gaps about DBS in PD patients with an intent to improve health outcomes. 

Questionnaires have a long history of utility in PD, however studies have not specifically assessed patient knowledge of DBS in PD. A survey was generated using commercial software and is being administered to patients over the next 6 months. The 23-point questionnaire utilizes Likert response options to explore patient knowledge of DBS. 

17 subjects thus far have completed the survey. The majority (64.7%) erroneously believed that DBS will alter the natural course of their PD. Most (82.4%) believe the efficacy of DBS is similar to optimal pharmacotherapy, would improve tremor (88.2%), slowness (58.8%), stiffness (64.7%), dyskinesia (52.9% ), and walking (52.9%). When asked about the potential side effects of DBS, most (94.1%) patients knew about the possibility of brain bleed or speech impairment, 76.5% acknowledged the potential for stroke and cognitive impairment, and 88.2% chose infection as a possible adverse event. Finally, 100% of respondents correctly knew that DBS does not mean that all PD medications can be eliminated, that future maintenance procedures are likely, and DBS has been shown to improve quality of life. 

Although a lot of patients demonstrated sound knowledge about DBS, misconceptions are still indeed prevalent. Identification of these knowledge gaps is vital towards improving health literacy and the findings described herein will form the basis for effective educational interventions.  

Authors/Disclosures
Austin Oblack, DO
PRESENTER
Dr. Oblack has nothing to disclose.
Shilpa Chitnis, MD, PhD, FAAN, FANA (UT Tyler School of Medicine) Dr. Chitnis has received publishing royalties from a publication relating to health care.
Bilal Haque, Other Mr. Haque has nothing to disclose.
Nida Jasmein Ahmed Ms. Ahmed has nothing to disclose.
Meagen Salinas, MD (North Texas VA Health Care System) The institution of Dr. Salinas has received research support from North Texas VA Health Care System New Investigator Award.
Bradley McDaniels, PhD (University of North Texas) Dr. McDaniels has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving on a Speakers Bureau for NeuroChallenge.
Nader Pouratian Nader Pouratian has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Boston Scientific. Nader Pouratian has received personal compensation in the range of $5,000-$9,999 for serving as a Consultant for Abbott. Nader Pouratian has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Sensoria Therapeutics. Nader Pouratian has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving on a Speakers Bureau for BrainLab.
Umar Yazdani (UT SOUTHWESTERN MEDICAL CENTER) Mr. Yazdani has nothing to disclose.