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Abstract Details

Cognitive Assessment is Feasible After Acute Stroke and Can Identify Co-occurrence of Spatial Neglect
Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology
P5 - Poster Session 5 (11:45 AM-12:45 PM)
2-003
Most people are unaware of cognitive problems.  Aphasia, delirium, SN, global cognitive impairment (GCI), and depression are common in the days after stroke, however even experienced clinicians can miss signs without systematic cognitive assessment. It is crucial to identify co-occurrence of these conditions; the disorders are individually associated with worse functional outcomes.
1) Determine whether beside screening of aphasia, delirium, spatial neglect (SN), global cognitive impairment (GCI), and depression is feasible in the stroke unit. 2) Determine the incidence and co-occurrence of these disorders

Bedside psychometric assessments were completed during acute stroke care (606 patients) with standardized and validated screening: 1) 3D-CAM for delirium, 2) Language Screening Test for aphasia, 3) Catherine Bergego Scale (short form) for SN, 4) Montreal cognitive assessment for GCI, and 5) Patient Health Questionnaire-8 for depression. We used standardized cutoffs to identify deficits, and summary statistics to determine the incidence/co-occurrence of deficits.

More than 98% of patients could be assessed with at least one screener, with > 95% completion rate on each measure (good feasibility). Of 565 patients completing all screening instruments, 94% met criterion for GCI, 53% for SN, 27% for aphasia, 22% for depression, and 15% for delirium; 9% of patients presented with no deficits, 30% had one deficit and 61% had two or more deficits. Of the 183 individuals with two deficits, the most common combination (116 patients, 63%) was SN and GCI.  

Bedside assessment of cognitive disorders is feasible after acute stroke. Multiple deficits are common: more than half of patients assessed had two or more deficits. SN and GCI commonly occurred together after stroke. Future research can examine whether stroke patients with abnormal MoCA scores may have undiagnosed SN and how co-occurring deficits affect risk of later dementia, functional decline and increased caregiver burden.

Authors/Disclosures
Sabrina Hickle, PhD (Emory University School of Medicine)
PRESENTER
Dr. Hickle has nothing to disclose.
Janice Convoy-Hellmann, Other (Emory Healthcare) Ms. Hellmann has nothing to disclose.
David W. Loring, PhD, FAAN (Emory Univ, Dept of Neurology) Dr. Loring has received personal compensation in the range of $5,000-$9,999 for serving as an Editor, Associate Editor, or Editorial Advisory Board Member for Springer Nature. Dr. Loring has received personal compensation in the range of $5,000-$9,999 for serving as an Editor, Associate Editor, or Editorial Advisory Board Member for ILAE. The institution of Dr. Loring has received research support from NIH. Dr. Loring has received publishing royalties from a publication relating to health care.
Jessica Saurman, PhD (Emory University School of Medicine) Dr. Saurman has nothing to disclose.
Karima Benameur, MD (Emory University) Dr. Benameur has nothing to disclose.
Shilpa Krishnan (Emory) The institution of Shilpa Krishnan has received research support from National Instuitutes of Health. Shilpa Krishnan has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as a Research Consultant with The Board of Medicine.
Fadi B. Nahab, MD Dr. Nahab has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as an Expert Witness for Legal Consultation. Dr. Nahab has received intellectual property interests from a discovery or technology relating to health care.
A. M. Barrett, MD, FAAN (UMass Memorial) The institution of Dr. Barrett has received research support from Veterans Health Association. The institution of Dr. Barrett has received research support from National Institutes of Health. The institution of Dr. Barrett has received research support from Mabel H Flory Trust. Dr. Barrett has received personal compensation in the range of $0-$499 for serving as a author, chapter with WebMD.