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Abstract Details

Sleep Duration is Associated with Clinically Silent Brain Injury in Middle-Aged Persons without Stroke
Sleep
P1 - Poster Session 1 (8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
11-004
Evidence indicates that optimization of cardiovascular health during middle age leads to brain health benefits later in life. The AHA Life’s Simple 7, a research and public health construct for cardiovascular health, recently added sleep as a risk factor, becoming the Life’s Essential 8 (LE8).
To study whether suboptimal sleep duration worsens neuroimaging brain health profiles in middle-aged persons without stroke.
We conducted a cross-sectional neuroimaging analysis within the UK Biobank. We included participants without stroke/dementia who underwent research brain MRI. We created a 6-category sleep score according to hours of sleep (best to worse): 7 to <9h; 9 to <10h; 6 to <7h; 5 to <6 or >=10h; 4 to <5h; and <4h. We evaluated 3 neuroimaging traits: white matter hyperintensity volume (natural log-transformed), fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD). For FA and MD, we evaluated the first principal component of measurements obtained across 48 neuroanatomical regions.
Of 502,408 participants enrolled in the UKB, 39,937 (7.9%) stroke/dementia-free enrollees participated in the brain MRI study (mean age 55, 53% female). The distribution of sleep categories was: 1 (n=28,958, 72.51%), 2 (n=2060, 5.16%), 3 (n=7165, 17.94%), 4 (n=1,562, 3.91%), 5 (n=163, 0.41%) and 6 (n=29, 0.07%). In multivariable linear regression analyses, a higher (worse) sleep score was associated with larger WMH volume (beta 0.026, SE=0.0046; p<0.001) and worse FA profile (beta 0.003, SE=0.0008; p<0.001), with no association observed for MD (p=0.77). For FA, when evaluating the 48 neuroanatomical regions separately, the most compromised areas were the right cerebral peduncle (p<0.001) and left and right cerebellar peduncles (p<0.001).
Among middle-aged participants enrolled in the UKB, suboptimal sleep duration was significantly associated with adverse neuroimaging brain health profiles. Sleep duration may thus determine brain health in middle-aged persons who have not developed clinically evident manifestations of poor brain health (stroke or dementia).
Authors/Disclosures
Santiago Clocchiatti-Tuozzo (Yale University, Department of Neurology)
PRESENTER
Mr. Clocchiatti-Tuozzo has nothing to disclose.
Cyprien Rivier, MD (Yale University) Dr. Rivier has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Pyxis Partners.
Daniela Brenda Renedo, MD (Yale University) Dr. Renedo has nothing to disclose.
Victor Manuel Torres-Lopez, MA (Yale University) Mr. Torres-Lopez has nothing to disclose.
Sam Payabvash Sam Payabvash has nothing to disclose.
Kevin N. Sheth, MD, FAAN (Yale UniversityDivision of Neuro and Critical Care) Dr. Sheth has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Ceribell. Dr. Sheth has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for Zoll. Dr. Sheth has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for NControl. Dr. Sheth has received stock or an ownership interest from Astrocyte. Dr. Sheth has received stock or an ownership interest from Alva. The institution of Dr. Sheth has received research support from Biogen. The institution of Dr. Sheth has received research support from Novartis. The institution of Dr. Sheth has received research support from Bard. The institution of Dr. Sheth has received research support from Hyperfine. Dr. Sheth has received intellectual property interests from a discovery or technology relating to health care.
Thomas Gill Thomas Gill has nothing to disclose.
Guido Jose Falcone, MD (Yale School of Medicine) The institution of Dr. Falcone has received research support from NIH. The institution of Dr. Falcone has received research support from AHA.