Log In

Forgot Password?
Create New Account

Loading... please wait

Abstract Details

Exploring the Relationship Between Cerebrospinal Fluid Interleukin-6 and Cerebral Autoregulation After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
Neuro Trauma and Critical Care
S23 - Neurocritical Care (1:36 PM-1:48 PM)
004
Elevated levels of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) have been correlated with delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). However, the role of neuroinflammation in SAH pathophysiology remains incompletely understood. In a pig stroke model, IL-6 antagonist prevented hypotension-induced pial artery impairment, suggesting a role in post-stroke vascular derangement. 
This research assesses serial CSF IL-6 levels' relationship with cerebral autoregulation in aSAH patients.
We prospectively enrolled aSAH patients at Yale-New Haven Hospital. Autoregulatory function was measured by interrogating changes in near-infrared spectroscopy-derived tissue oxygenation response to changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP). The resulting autoregulatory index was used to trend the MAP range at which autoregulation was most preserved. Percent time that MAP exceeded the upper limit of autoregulation or decreased below the lower limit of autoregulation was calculated for each patient. IL-6 levels were assessed through serial CSF samples and correlated with hemodynamic parameters.
We calculated limits of autoregulation for twenty-two patients (mean age 60 ± 9 years, mean Hunt Hess score 3.4 ± 1.2, mean modified Fisher score 3.7 ± 0.58, average monitoring time 10.1 ± 7.3 hours). Optimal MAP and limits were calculated an average of 74% ± 20% of monitoring time. Our study provides preliminary support for a potential association between IL-6 levels and percent time that MAP was within limits of autoregulation (b = -0.31, p=0.009, Fig. 1A). Additionally, there was a significant correlation between IL-6 levels and the extent to which MAP deviated from computed optimal MAP (r= 0.636, p=0.009, Fig. 1B).
IL-6 may contribute to impaired autoregulation post aSAH. Further studies are needed to validate findings and refine MAP management for improved outcomes in aSAH patients.
Authors/Disclosures
Madelynne Olexa
PRESENTER
Miss Olexa has nothing to disclose.
Yelyzaveta Begunova Miss Begunova has nothing to disclose.
Emily Gilmore (Yale University School of Medicine) Dr. Gilmore has received personal compensation in the range of $5,000-$9,999 for serving as a Consultant for carpl.ai. Dr. Gilmore has received personal compensation in the range of $0-$499 for serving as a Consultant for AAN. Dr. Gilmore has received research support from NIH.
Jennifer Kim (Yale University School of Medicine) Dr. Kim has nothing to disclose.
Alison Herman Ms. Herman has nothing to disclose.
Rachel Beekman (Yale New Haven Medical Center) Dr. Beekman has nothing to disclose.
Jessica Magid-Bernstein (Yale School of Medicine) Dr. Magid-Bernstein has nothing to disclose.
No disclosure on file
Kevin Sheth (Yale UniversityDivision of Neuro and Critical Care) Dr. Sheth has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Ceribell. Dr. Sheth has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for Zoll. Dr. Sheth has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for NControl. Dr. Sheth has received stock or an ownership interest from Astrocyte. Dr. Sheth has received stock or an ownership interest from Alva. The institution of Dr. Sheth has received research support from Biogen. The institution of Dr. Sheth has received research support from Novartis. The institution of Dr. Sheth has received research support from Bard. The institution of Dr. Sheth has received research support from Hyperfine. Dr. Sheth has received intellectual property interests from a discovery or technology relating to health care.
Eliza Miller (Columbia University Dept of Neurology) Dr. Miller has received personal compensation in the range of $5,000-$9,999 for serving as an Expert Witness for medical malpractice cases. The institution of Dr. Miller has received research support from National Institutes of Health. Dr. Miller has a non-compensated relationship as a member of ASA Advisory Council with American Heart Association/American Stroke Association that is relevant to AAN interests or activities.
Santiago Ortega Gutierrez (University of Iowa) Dr. Ortega Gutierrez has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as a Consultant for stryker. Dr. Ortega Gutierrez has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as a Consultant for medtronic. Dr. Ortega Gutierrez has received personal compensation in the range of $5,000-$9,999 for serving as a Consultant for microvention. Dr. Ortega Gutierrez has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for Medtronic. The institution of Dr. Ortega Gutierrez has received research support from stryker. The institution of Dr. Ortega Gutierrez has received research support from Medtronic. The institution of Dr. Ortega Gutierrez has received research support from Methinks. The institution of Dr. Ortega Gutierrez has received research support from NIH.
Adam De Havenon (Yale University) Dr. De Havenon has received personal compensation in the range of $5,000-$9,999 for serving as a Consultant for Novo Nordisk. Dr. De Havenon has stock in Certus. Dr. De Havenon has stock in TitinKM. The institution of Dr. De Havenon has received research support from NIH/NINDS. Dr. De Havenon has received publishing royalties from a publication relating to health care.
Lauren Sansing Dr. Sansing has nothing to disclose.
Nils Petersen (Yale University) Dr. Petersen has received research support from NIH.