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Abstract Details

Binocular Visual Function Testing in an Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (ADRC) Cohort: Low-contrast Letter Acuity and Rapid Automatized Naming (RAN) Tasks of MULES and SUN
Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology
S40 - Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology (2:00 PM-2:12 PM)
006
Binocular vision testing, performed with both eyes together, is useful for reflecting daily activities. LCLA, the MULES and the SUN have been used successfully in studies of multiple sclerosis, concussion and Parkinson’s disease. 

We determined the capacity for binocular visual measures of low-contrast letter acuity (LCLA), Mobile Universal Lexicon Evaluation System (MULES, rapid picture naming) and the Staggered Uneven Number (SUN, rapid number naming) to distinguish patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to Alzheimer’s disease and Alzheimer’s dementia (AD) vs. cognitively normal controls.

Participants were invited at a single-institution ADRC; all had diagnoses of MCI or AD by NIA-AA criteria or were cognitively normal controls.  LCLA was tested at 2.5% and 1.25%. MULES and SUN were administered using paper/pencil and computerized tablet (Mobile Integrated Cognitive Kit [MICK] app).

There were 75 participants (31 MCI, 10 AD, 34 controls; aged 74±6 years). LCLA scores at 2.5% were significantly lower (worse) in MCI vs. controls (28 vs. 36 letters, p=0.02, two-sample t-test); this was similar for 1.25% (5 letters for MCI vs. 12 for controls, p=0.004). MULES times were slower (worse) in MCI compared with controls using the tablet (75 sec for MCI vs. 60 for controls, p=0.03), and for AD vs. controls for both paper/pencil (152 vs. 59 sec, p=0.0001) and tablet (100 vs. 60 sec, p=0.003). SUN test scores, however, did not differ between MCI and controls, but better distinguished AD vs. controls for both paper/pencil (84 vs. 56 sec, p=0.0001) and tablet (85 vs. 60 sec, p=0.003).

Binocular low-contrast acuity, MULES and SUN have potential roles in MCI and AD in a manner similar to multiple sclerosis and are analogous to patient-specific measures such as cognition. MULES, SUN and LCLA complement eye-specific measures and may promote identification of MCI for early clinical trial participation and for disease-modifying therapies.

Authors/Disclosures
Lauren Seidman
PRESENTER
Miss Seidman has nothing to disclose.
Sara Hyman (new york university) Ms. Hyman has nothing to disclose.
Steven Galetta (NYU Langone Medical Center) Dr. Galetta has nothing to disclose.
Arjun Masurkar (NYU Langone Medical Center) The institution of Dr. Masurkar has received research support from NIH. The institution of Dr. Masurkar has received research support from Alzheimer's Association. The institution of Dr. Masurkar has received research support from BrightFocus Foundation. Dr. Masurkar has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a IRGP Advisory Council Member with Alzheimer's Association. Dr. Masurkar has a non-compensated relationship as a Steering Committee Member with Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study that is relevant to AAN interests or activities.
Laura Balcer (NYU Grossman School of Medicine) An immediate family member of Dr. Balcer has received personal compensation in the range of $5,000-$9,999 for serving as a Consultant for Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Dr. Balcer has received personal compensation in the range of $50,000-$99,999 for serving as an Editor, Associate Editor, or Editorial Advisory Board Member for North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society.