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Abstract Details

MOGAD Presenting Atypically with Severely Elevated ICP and Meningoencephalitis: Severe Complicated Hospital Course Followed by Return to Near Baseline
Autoimmune Neurology
P9 - Poster Session 9 (8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
14-013
Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein associated disease (MOGAD) was first proposed as a distinct demyelinating disease in 2007. Its entire range of phenotypes is yet to be established.

Increase awareness that MOGAD can present with a phenotype of subacute CSF pleocytosis, seizures, alterned mental status, and malignant elevated ICP. Negative infectious work up in the setting of meningoencephalitis with or without elevated ICP pediatric population should prompt early evaluation for the presence of MOG antibodies.

Case report
We present an atypical case of a 15 year old boy with features identical to a viral meningoencephalitis with severely elevated ICP who was then diagnosed with MOGAD. After treatment with steroids, 7 rounds of PLEX and tocilizumab, he improved to near baseline. Literature review We reviewed other atypical MOGAD presentations for comparison.
MOGAD can present with a phenotype of subacute CSF pleocytosis, seizures, alterned mental status, and malignant elevated ICP. Negative infectious work up in the setting of meningoencephalitis with or without elevated ICP pediatric population should prompt early evaluation for the presence of MOG antibodies.
Authors/Disclosures
Celeste R. Camargo, MD (Rutgers)
PRESENTER
Dr. Camargo has nothing to disclose.
Amanda R. Spinner, MD Dr. Spinner has nothing to disclose.
Vikram Bhise, MD (Rutgers - Robert Wood Johnson Medical School) Dr. Bhise has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for Cycle Pharmaceuticals. The institution of Dr. Bhise has received research support from Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield.