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Abstract Details

Digital Medical Simulation Platform Improves Neurologists’ Ability to Assess for and Diagnose Muscular Dystrophies
Education, Research, and Methodology
P11 - Poster Session 11 (5:30 PM-6:30 PM)
7-006
DMD is the most common form of muscular dystrophy. Despite what is known about the causes and symptoms of DMD, initial symptoms may be subtle and or overlap with other muscular dystrophies resulting in delays in diagnosis.  

This study utilized an online medical simulation platform to improve the ability of neurologists’ to assess, differentiate between, and diagnose either Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) or limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD).

The simulation consisted of two cases presented in a platform that allowed learners to choose from lab tests and assessment scales to arrive at the correct diagnosis. The clinical decisions made by the participants were analyzed using an artificial intelligence engine, and instantaneous clinical guidance was provided employing current evidence-based and expert faculty recommendations. Statistical significance was determined by a McNemar’s test, comparing decisions made after guidance with those made before guidance. Data were collected from June 2022 through September 2022.

The assessment sample consisted of 116 neurologists. A significant (P<0.05) pre-vs post guidance improvement was seen in selecting a Gowers’s sign assessment in both cases. Approximately 80% of learners correctly ordered creatinine kinase levels for both cases, a number that improved to approximately 89% after receiving guidance. >50% learners knew the correct diagnosis (either DMD or LGMD) on the first try.  After receiving guidance, there was an approximate 20% improvement in making the correct diagnosis.  Among learners who never made a correct diagnosis, commonly chosen rationales included: symptoms indicated another diagnosis, neuromuscular testing indicated another diagnosis, and lack of familiarity with how to assess the patient.
This study demonstrated the success of simulation-based educational interventions on improving the assessment and diagnosis of patients with muscular dystrophies. Future education should focus on how early symptoms of a muscular dystrophy should inform the selection of appropriate assessment modalities and how to interpret diagnostic testing.   
Authors/Disclosures
Christine Considine (Medscape)
PRESENTER
No disclosure on file
Thomas Finnegan, Jr., PhD (Medscape Education) Dr. Finnegan has nothing to disclose.
Meg Monday No disclosure on file
John Brandsema, MD (Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Neurology) Dr. Brandsema has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as a Consultant for Biogen. Dr. Brandsema has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as a Consultant for Genentech. Dr. Brandsema has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as a Consultant for PTC Therapeutics. Dr. Brandsema has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as a Consultant for Sarepta. Dr. Brandsema has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as a Consultant for Novartis. Dr. Brandsema has received personal compensation in the range of $5,000-$9,999 for serving as a Consultant for Argenx. Dr. Brandsema has received personal compensation in the range of $5,000-$9,999 for serving as a Consultant for Janssen. Dr. Brandsema has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Dyne. Dr. Brandsema has received personal compensation in the range of $5,000-$9,999 for serving as a Consultant for Fibrogen. Dr. Brandsema has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Takeda. Dr. Brandsema has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for Edgewise. The institution of Dr. Brandsema has received research support from Novartis. The institution of Dr. Brandsema has received research support from Biogen. The institution of Dr. Brandsema has received research support from Alexion. The institution of Dr. Brandsema has received research support from CSL Behring. The institution of Dr. Brandsema has received research support from Pfizer. The institution of Dr. Brandsema has received research support from PTC Therapeutics. The institution of Dr. Brandsema has received research support from Sarepta. The institution of an immediate family member of Dr. Brandsema has received research support from Argenx. The institution of Dr. Brandsema has received research support from Astellas. The institution of Dr. Brandsema has received research support from Fibrogen. The institution of Dr. Brandsema has received research support from Genentech. The institution of Dr. Brandsema has received research support from Janssen. The institution of Dr. Brandsema has received research support from Scholar Rock.