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Abstract Details

Predictors of Wernicke Encephalopathy in Adults Admitted for Acute Alcohol Induced Pancreatitis in the United States
General Neurology
P8 - Poster Session 8 (5:30 PM-6:30 PM)
4-005

WE, an acute reversible complication in chronic alcoholics, can occur in AAIP. Patients often have confusion, ophthalmoparesis, and nystagmus. Identifying potential risk factors can lead to sooner identification and hopefully prevention.


To identify risk factors of Wernicke Encephalopathy (WE) in adults admitted for acute alcohol-induced pancreatitis (AAIP).
Adults hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of AAIP were queried from the 2016-2020 National Inpatient Sample (NIS). Factors influencing events of WE were estimated via multivariable regression analysis. 

We found 372,860 patients diagnosed with AAIP, of which 785 (0.2%) developed WE. Events of WE were more common in patients who had hypokalemia (aOR 2.131, p<0.01), acidosis (aOR 1.927, p<0.01), hypo-osmolarity/hyponatremia (aOR 1.818, p<0.01),  age≥ 60 years (aOR 1.818, p<0.01), history of alcohol abuse (aOR 5.251, p<0.01) and depression (aOR 2.007, p<0.01), experienced events of acute kidney injury (AKI) (aOR 2.843, p<0.01). While Hispanics showed higher odds of WE compared to Whites (aOR 1.286, p=0.044), no differences were seen between Blacks and Whites (aOR 0.907, p=0.310).  Meanwhile, lower odds of WE were reported among Medicaid-insured patients (vs. Medicare, aOR 0.746, p=0.010) and those with diabetes (aOR 0.697, p<0.01). No differences were seen in females vs. males (aOR 0.932, p=0.387). For AAIP admissions, events of WE led to poorer outcomes with higher mortality than those without events of WE (1.6% vs. 0.2%, aOR 2.616, p<0.01).


Hypokalemia, acidosis, hypo-osmolarity/hyponatremia, age≥ 60 years, events of AKI, history of alcohol abuse, depression, and Hispanic race had higher odds of developing WE. These risk factors will help clinicians anticipate WE in adults presenting with AAIP allowing patients to receive appropriate counseling and prompt interventions to prevent disease progression.


Authors/Disclosures
Prince K. Pekyi-Boateng, MBBS (Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital)
PRESENTER
Dr. Pekyi-Boateng has nothing to disclose.
No disclosure on file
Maya Gabel, MD (University of Miami) Dr. Gabel has nothing to disclose.
No disclosure on file
No disclosure on file
Shaheen Sombans, MBBS (Fernandez Foundation) Dr. Sombans has nothing to disclose.
No disclosure on file
No disclosure on file
No disclosure on file
No disclosure on file
No disclosure on file
No disclosure on file