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Abstract Details

Associations Between Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and the Outcomes of Post-acute Sequelae of COVID-19 (PASC): An EPIC Electronic Medical Record System Retrospective Study
Infectious Disease
P11 - Poster Session 11 (5:30 PM-6:30 PM)
13-003
Hyperactivation of humoral immune pathway, including IL-6 was reported in severe COVID-19 infection. However, the association of abnormal IL-6 and PASC has not be investigated.
To investigate if there is there an association between increased interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels and the outcomes of post-acute sequelae of COVID-19 (PASC).
We conducted a retrospective analysis using the EPIC Electronic Medical Record System for the years 2020 to 2023 to identify PASC patients with normal or abnormal levels of serum IL-6. The IL-6 grouping was determined using LOINC coding procedures. Patient discharge to hospice was incorporated into mortality.
3,081 PASC patients with abnormal serum IL-6 (P1) were compared to 425 PASC patients with normal serum IL-6 (P2). The diagnostic rate with concomitant neuro-PASC symptoms was not significantly different between P1 and P2 (P1/P2: 72.7% vs 73.9%; p>0.05). P1 patients had a significantly higher mortality rate (P1/P2: 10.3% vs 2.8%; p<0.05), higher mechanical ventilation rates (P1/P2: 28.6% vs 5.2%; p<0.05), greater percentage of patients with an elevated BMI (71.3% vs 46.4%; p<0.05), higher rate of disability (P1/P2: 18.5% vs 12.0%; p<0.05), older age (P1/P2: 59±0.62 years vs 50±1.79 years; p<0.05), and longer length of hospitalization (P1/P2: 11.3±0.57 days vs 8±1.74 days; p<0.05) There was a significantly more women in P1 compared to P2 (P1 M/F: 33.4%/66.6% vs P2 M/F: 52.0%/47.9%; p<0.05).
PASC patients with abnormal serum levels of IL-6 have significantly higher rates of mortality, length of stay, disability, and rate of mechanical ventilation compared to PASC patients with normal serum levels of IL-6. They also tend to have higher BMI values.
Authors/Disclosures
James Lin, MS
PRESENTER
Mr. Lin has nothing to disclose.
Kazim Jaffry Mr. Jaffry has nothing to disclose.
Suhayb Islam (Rutgers University) Mr. Islam has nothing to disclose.
Scott Karpenos No disclosure on file
Narjis Jaffry No disclosure on file
Justin Matos No disclosure on file
Daniel L. Menkes, MD, FAAN (Neuroscience Center) An immediate family member of Dr. Menkes has received personal compensation for serving as an employee of NIH. An immediate family member of Dr. Menkes has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as a Consultant for CMTE. An immediate family member of Dr. Menkes has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for NIH. Dr. Menkes has received personal compensation in the range of $100,000-$499,999 for serving as an Expert Witness for Self Employed. An immediate family member of Dr. Menkes has received research support from Helmsley Foundation . An immediate family member of Dr. Menkes has received intellectual property interests from a discovery or technology relating to health care.
Nizar Souayah, MD, FAAN (NJMS) Dr. Souayah has received publishing royalties from a publication relating to health care.