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Abstract Details

How Women and Men with Parkinson’s Disease Approach Decision-making for Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery
Movement Disorders
P1 - Poster Session 1 (8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
3-011

Despite being an efficacious therapy for Parkinson’s disease (PD), women make up only 23-30% of recipients, a discrepancy that is not accounted for by differences in PD incidence. One of the many factors that may contribute to this utilization gap includes gender differences in preferences and decision-making. 

Explore differences in how women and men approach the decision for deep brain stimulation in terms of informational needs and decision satisfaction.

In this qualitative study, participants with PD who were considering DBS or had undergone evaluation within the past 3 years participated in semi-structured interviews. An interview guide was developed based on the shared decision-making and DBS literature and the Ottawa Decision Support Framework. Data were analyzed using content analysis methodology to identify major themes. 

Sixteen women and 17 men participated in interviews. Seven participants decided to not undergo DBS. We identified four key themes. First, information sources were similar while information needs differed by gender. Women wanted more information about their post-surgical appearance. Second, the reasons for DBS surgery were often very personal. Women reported spending more time with family as a motivating factor. Third, the decision to undergo DBS surgery was often a long process that started soon after medication escalation with intolerable side effects and included a cycle of information gathering, considering DBS and weighing the risks and benefits. Fourth, while many expressed fear of brain surgery, trust in the surgeon and DBS team helped many overcome this fear. Women in particular tended to describe the risks as not pertaining to them in order to feel more confident moving forward with surgery.

We found gender differences in information needs, reasons patients decided to undergo surgery and how patients weighed risks and benefits, which can be used to inform educational tools and counseling for DBS.

Authors/Disclosures
Michelle Fullard, MD (University of Colorado Anschutz)
PRESENTER
Dr. Fullard has received research support from Davis Phinney Foundation. Dr. Fullard has received research support from Michael J. Fox Foundation. The institution of Dr. Fullard has received research support from NIH BIRCWH K12. Dr. Fullard has received research support from Lorna G. Moore Faculty Launch Fund.
No disclosure on file
No disclosure on file
Drew S. Kern, MD, FAAN (University of Colorado) Dr. Kern has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Medtronic. The institution of Dr. Kern has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Boston Scientific. The institution of Dr. Kern has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Abbvie. Dr. Kern has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Abbott. The institution of Dr. Kern has received research support from Boston Scientific. The institution of Dr. Kern has received research support from AbbVie Pharmaceticals. Dr. Kern has received research support from Medtronic.
No disclosure on file
No disclosure on file