Log In

Forgot Password?
Create New Account

Loading... please wait

Abstract Details

Different Response to Blood Pressure Reduction in Lobar and Deep Intracerebral Hemorrhage
Neuro Trauma and Critical Care
P10 - Poster Session 10 (11:45 AM-12:45 PM)
2-004
Blood pressure (BP) reduction is associated with better neuroimaging and clinical outcomes in patients with spontaneous, non-traumatic ICH. Because this evidence comes from studies that overwhelmingly enrolled deep hemorrhages, the impact of BP reduction in patients with lobar ICH remains understudied.
To test the hypothesis that the response to intensive BP reduction is different among patients with deep and lobar intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH).
We re-analyzed data from the pivotal Antihypertensive Treatment of Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage-2 (ATACH-2) study. We included all patients with available neuroimaging data. Participants were randomized to either intensive (systolic BP target 110-139 mmHg) or standard (systolic BP target 140-179 mmHg) acute BP lowering. The main outcome measures were hematoma expansion > 6 mL in the first 24 hours (HE), poor functional outcome (3-month mRS 4-6) and renal adverse events (RAE) until day 7 or hospital discharge. We fitted multivariable logistic regression models to test for association between the intervention and our outcomes of interest.
Among 1,000 patients enrolled in ATACH-2, 875 (87.5%) with complete data were included (88.9% deep hemorrhages and 11.1% lobar hemorrhages). The baseline characteristics of the intensive and standard treatment groups remained balanced as in the original study (all comparisons p >0.05). Multivariable logistic regression showed that intensive BP reduction decreased in the risk of HE (OR 0.60, 95%CI 0.39-0.90; p=0.02) and increased the risk of RAE (OR 2.53, 95%CI 1.40-4.77; p=0.003) in patients with deep, but not lobar ICH (HE, p=0.83 and RAE, p=0.53). Intensive BP reduction was not associated with improved mRS in either location group (p > 0.05).
The impact of intensive blood pressure lowering differs in deep and lobar ICH. These results emphasize the need for a better understanding about biologic differences in ICH, which may have therapeutic implications.
Authors/Disclosures
Maximiliano A. Hawkes, MD (Mayo Clinic)
PRESENTER
Dr. Hawkes has nothing to disclose.
Santiago Clocchiatti-Tuozzo (Yale University, Department of Neurology) Mr. Clocchiatti-Tuozzo has nothing to disclose.
Cyprien Rivier, MD (Yale University) Dr. Rivier has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Pyxis Partners.
Adnan I. Qureshi, MD (Dept of Neurology) Dr. Qureshi has received personal compensation in the range of $5,000-$9,999 for serving as a Consultant for AstraZeneca.
No disclosure on file
Nils Petersen, MD (Yale University) Dr. Petersen has received research support from NIH.
Adam De Havenon, MD, FAAN (Yale University) Dr. De Havenon has received personal compensation in the range of $5,000-$9,999 for serving as a Consultant for Novo Nordisk. Dr. De Havenon has stock in Certus. Dr. De Havenon has stock in TitinKM. The institution of Dr. De Havenon has received research support from NIH/NINDS. Dr. De Havenon has received publishing royalties from a publication relating to health care.
Kevin N. Sheth, MD, FAAN (Yale UniversityDivision of Neuro and Critical Care) Dr. Sheth has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for Ceribell. Dr. Sheth has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for Zoll. Dr. Sheth has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for NControl. Dr. Sheth has received stock or an ownership interest from Astrocyte. Dr. Sheth has received stock or an ownership interest from Alva. The institution of Dr. Sheth has received research support from Biogen. The institution of Dr. Sheth has received research support from Novartis. The institution of Dr. Sheth has received research support from Bard. The institution of Dr. Sheth has received research support from Hyperfine. Dr. Sheth has received intellectual property interests from a discovery or technology relating to health care.
Guido J. Falcone, MD (Yale School of Medicine) The institution of Dr. Falcone has received research support from NIH. The institution of Dr. Falcone has received research support from AHA.