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Abstract Details

Use Of The Addenbrooke´S Cognitive Examination III (ACE-III) For The Diagnosis Of Cognitive Impairment In Lima, Peru
Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology
P6 - Poster Session 6 (5:30 PM-6:30 PM)
7-008

The peruvian adaptation of the ACE-III has been previously validated as a culturally sensitive tool for dementia screening. However, the diagnostic performance of this tool was not assessed in an independent cohort. Thus, we aimed to determine the diagnostic performance of ACE-III in diagnosis of MCI and dementia in Lima, Peru

Determine the performance of the ACE-III brief cognitive test (BCT) on the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia in Lima, Peru.

We recruited a cohort of randomly selected individuals from Lima, Peru, recruited as part of an international Latin-American project for multiple BCT validation.  Patients were evaluated sequentially: screened through the MMSE, diagnosed with the Hachinski scale, PFAQ2 and Beck Depression inventory, and finally classified with CDR and DSM-V criteria. The ACE-III was applied during the second stage and was not used for patient selection. We compared average total scores and between using ANOVA. We correlated each domain to the CDR scores using a Spearman correlation coefficient. For diagnostic performance, we used a Receiver Operating Curve (ROC). 

We included 246 patients: 96 controls, 57 with MCI and 93 with dementia. Average ACE-III scores was79.9 ± 3.16, 68.6 ± 3.30 and 58.0 ± 3.14, respectively. Differences were statistically significant between groups for all domains and total score (p<0.001). Total ACE-III score was correlated to IFS by 0.79 (0.74 – 0.84, p<0.001) and to CDR by -0.9 (-0.92 - -0.87, p<0.001).  The total ACE-III score had an AUC of 98.7% (IC95 97-99%) for MCI and 100% for dementia. 

We found that ACE-III had an excellent diagnostic performance for MCI and AD in a Latin-American population. This highlights the importance of cultural and linguistic adaptations of BCTs to improve diagnostic performance.

Authors/Disclosures
Marco Moises Malaga, MD (University of California in San Francisco)
PRESENTER
Mr. Malaga has nothing to disclose.
Nilton Custodio Capunay, MD, FAAN (Instituto Peruano De Neurociencias) Dr. Custodio Capunay has nothing to disclose.
Rosa Montesinos (Instituto Peruano de Neurociencias) Rosa Montesinos has nothing to disclose.
Diego Chambergo-Michilot, Other Mr. Chambergo-Michilot has nothing to disclose.
Fiorella Alejandra Baca, II, PhD (INEN) Miss Baca has nothing to disclose.
Juan Carlos Carbajal, Jr., MD (Instituto Peruano de Neurociencias) Dr. Carbajal has nothing to disclose.
Jose Carlos Huilca, MD (Instituto Peruano de Neurociencias) Dr. Huilca has nothing to disclose.
David Lira, MD, FAAN (Instituto Peruano De Neurociencias - IPN) Dr. Lira has nothing to disclose.
Eder Herrera-Perez The institution of Eder Herrera-Perez has received research support from Universidad San Ignacio de Loyola.
Monica M. Diaz, MD (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) The institution of Dr. Diaz has received research support from Alzheimer's Association. The institution of Dr. Diaz has received research support from American Academy of Neurology. The institution of Dr. Diaz has received research support from Merck. The institution of Dr. Diaz has received research support from CorEvitas. The institution of Dr. Diaz has received research support from Celgene Corporation/Bristol-Myers Squibb. The institution of Dr. Diaz has received research support from Novartis. The institution of Dr. Diaz has received research support from Bodford Family Transverse Myelitis Center Fund.
Serggio Lanata, MD (UCSF) Dr. Lanata has nothing to disclose.