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Abstract Details

Identifying mixed Lewy body and Alzheimer’s disease pathologies using functional neuroimaging
Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology
P6 - Poster Session 6 (5:30 PM-6:30 PM)
2-002

Lewy body dementia (LBD) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are the two most common neurodegenerative causes of dementia. Autopsy studies report many cases with these clinical diagnoses having mixed pathology with alpha-synuclein, tau and amyloid proteinopathies. There is limited research in trying to distinguish these potential mixed pathology conditions prior to death. 

To distinguish between Alzheimer's disease, Lewy body dementia and Parkinson's disease using functional neuroimaging.

 

43 subjects were recruited from Ohio State University Memory Disorder and Movement Clinics. Subjects were diagnosed based on standard clinical criteria for DLB, PD and AD by fellowship trained cognitive and movement disorders faculty. Cognitive testing performed included MMSE and SAGE. We used neuroimaging methods including FDG PET, amyloid PET, and DaTscan SPECT to evaluate subjects diagnosed with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), AD and PD to investigate how often potential mixed pathologies could be present. The neuroimaging evaluations were blinded to clinical diagnosis.

28 subjects with clinical diagnosis of Lewy body disease (15 DLB and 13 PD) and 15 subjects with clinical diagnosis AD were compared. The Lewy body subjects were 69.5 ± 7.2 years old, MMSE 26.6 ± 4, and SAGE 18.4 ± 4.7. AD subjects were 68.4 ± 9.3 years old, MMSE 16.3 ± 6.4, and SAGE 7.4 ± 6.1. 5 subjects (33%) of the clinical AD cases showed abnormal DAT scan uptake, 3 subjects (20%) of the clinical AD cases were negative for amyloid with normal DaTscan uptake, 3 subjects (20%) of the clinical DLB cases showed mixed LBD and AD features, 2 subjects (13%) of the clinical DLB cases were positive for amyloid with normal DaTscan uptake, and 1 (8%) subject with clinical PD had normal DAT scan.
Based on functional neuroimaging, 26% of clinically diagnosed AD or DLB subjects had evidence of potential mixed pathologies and 25% were misdiagnosed.
Authors/Disclosures
Soumya Bouchachi, MD (Rutgers NJMS)
PRESENTER
Dr. Bouchachi has nothing to disclose.
Jessica Truelove, NP (The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center) Ms. Truelove has nothing to disclose.
Kristina Rawson, Other (The Ohio State University) Ms. Rawson has nothing to disclose.
Jennifer Icenhour, Other (The Ohio State University) Mrs. Icenhour has nothing to disclose.
Michael Knopp Michael Knopp has nothing to disclose.
Chadwick L. Wright, MD,PhD (Ohio State University) Prof. Wright has a non-compensated relationship as a Board of Directors Member with American Board of Science in Nuclear Medicine that is relevant to AAN interests or activities.
Douglas W. Scharre, MD, FAAN (Ohio State University) Dr. Scharre has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as a Consultant for BrainTest, Inc. Dr. Scharre has received personal compensation in the range of $5,000-$9,999 for serving as a Consultant for Vascular Scientific. Dr. Scharre has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for Acadia. Dr. Scharre has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving on a Scientific Advisory or Data Safety Monitoring board for Biogen. Dr. Scharre has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving on a Speakers Bureau for Acadia. Dr. Scharre has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving on a Speakers Bureau for Biogen. Dr. Scharre has received personal compensation in the range of $10,000-$49,999 for serving as an Expert Witness for Hickman & Lowder Co.. The institution of Dr. Scharre has received research support from InSightec. The institution of Dr. Scharre has received research support from Alzheimer's Therapeutic Research Institute (ATRI). The institution of Dr. Scharre has received research support from Eisai. The institution of Dr. Scharre has received research support from vTv Therapeutics. The institution of Dr. Scharre has received research support from National Institute of Health. The institution of Dr. Scharre has received research support from Eli Lilly. The institution of Dr. Scharre has received research support from Johns Hopkins. The institution of Dr. Scharre has received research support from Biogen. The institution of Dr. Scharre has received research support from Roche. The institution of Dr. Scharre has received research support from AZ Therapies. The institution of Dr. Scharre has received research support from Biohaven. The institution of Dr. Scharre has received research support from Novartis. The institution of Dr. Scharre has received research support from Avanir. The institution of Dr. Scharre has received research support from PrecisionMed, Inc. Dr. Scharre has received intellectual property interests from a discovery or technology relating to health care. Dr. Scharre has received intellectual property interests from a discovery or technology relating to health care.