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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Massachusetts Researcher Receives Award for MS Research

Funded by American Brain Foundation and National Multiple Sclerosis Society

SAN DIEGO – A Massachusetts researcher will receive a $225,000 award to continue her study of hormone differences in the development of multiple sclerosis (MS) through the American Brain Foundation and the National Multiple Sclerosis Society Clinician-Scientist Development Award. This award was presented in San Diego during the American Academy of Neurology’s 65th Annual Meeting, the world’s largest meeting of neurologists. Riley Bove, MD, a Fellow at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, was awarded the fellowship for her work investigating the differences shown by men and women in their risk of developing MS as well as differences in their course of the disease. “If we find that sex hormones do in fact influence MS risk then this may point to promising avenues for treatment,” said Bove. The three-year award will consist of an annual salary of $75,000 per year and is designed to encourage MS clinical research with the goal of providing better treatment, prevention or cure of the disease. Clinical research is the fundamental transition stage between discovery and treatment. Clinical research provides the scientific basis for all forms of care, addresses patient and caregiver needs and is the backbone for drug development and cost-effectiveness studies needed to improve lives. Fellowships provide recipients with up to three years of “protected time,” with salary that allows them to continue important research projects. Multiple sclerosis is an unpredictable disease of the central nervous system that disrupts communication between the brain and other parts of the body. MS patients experience muscle weakness in their extremities and difficulty with coordination and balance, among other symptoms. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS vary from one person to another. There is no known cure for multiple sclerosis at this time, but there are therapies available that may slow the disease and improve quality of life.

The American Brain Foundation, the foundation of the American Academy of Neurology, supports vital research and education to discover causes, improved treatments and cures for brain and other nervous system diseases. Learn more at http://CureBrainDisease.org. The American Academy of Neurology, an association of more than 26,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, is dedicated to promoting the highest quality patient-centered neurologic care. A neurologist is a doctor with specialized training in diagnosing, treating and managing disorders of the brain and nervous system such as Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, migraine, multiple sclerosis, concussion, Parkinson’s disease and epilepsy For more information about the American Academy of Neurology, visit http://www.aan.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and YouTube. MS organizations around the world and providing programs and services designed to help people with MS and their families move their lives forward. The Society is dedicated to achieving a world free of MS. For more information about the National MS Society, visit http://www.nationalMSsociety.org.


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