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Abstract Details

Measuring Burnout and Practices of Appreciation Within a Neurology Department: Identifying Prevalence and Shaping Solutions
Education, Research, and Methodology
S39 - Broadening the Scope of Medical Education in Neurology (4:54 PM-5:06 PM)
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Burnout results from misaligned job demands and resources. It affects healthcare workers more frequently than the general population. Since individual practices and departments have unique constellations of burnout drivers, mitigating this phenomenon cannot be accomplished using a one-size-fits-all approach. At the local level, highly valued and easily implementable recognition and appreciation practices may improve burnout.

The primary purpose of this study was to assess how different methods of recognition and appreciation are perceived by faculty and trainees in a neurology department at an academic medical center.

This study analysed responses from a cross-sectional survey distributed to all current faculty clinicians, residents, and fellows at a large academic neurology department. The survey combined demographics, the Moffitt Provider Appreciation Assessment, the single-item Mini-Z burnout inventory, and an ‘intent-to-leave’ question. Bivariable direct associations were conducted to assess the prevalence of burnout and how different institutional methods of appreciation were rated by respondents.

Among 90 respondents, 77 were faculty and 13 trainees. Both groups highly rated transparent efforts to reduce their daily frustrations and inclusion in decision making that impacts them. institutional awards and themed gifts were rated low by both groups. Trainees were significantly more burned out than faculty (p=0.046, Chi square test), but burnout was highly associated with intention to leave one’s current practice for faculty members (p<0.001, Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test) while not for trainees (p<0.89, Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test).

These results will enable our department to prioritize implementation of methods of recognition and appreciation that are highly rated by our faculty and trainees. While there is considerable overlap, some factors differ between the two groups. These methods for assessing burnout and institutional appreciation practices could be used by other organizations to identify approaches for expressing appreciation and recognition calibrated to those settings.

Authors/Disclosures
Sara Hyman (new york university)
PRESENTER
Ms. Hyman has nothing to disclose.
No disclosure on file
Laura Balcer (NYU Grossman School of Medicine) An immediate family member of Dr. Balcer has received personal compensation in the range of $5,000-$9,999 for serving as a Consultant for Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Dr. Balcer has received personal compensation in the range of $50,000-$99,999 for serving as an Editor, Associate Editor, or Editorial Advisory Board Member for North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society.
Neil Busis (NYU Langone Health) Dr. Busis has received personal compensation in the range of $500-$4,999 for serving as a Consultant for American Academy of Neurology. Dr. Busis has received personal compensation in the range of $0-$499 for serving as an Editor, Associate Editor, or Editorial Advisory Board Member for Neurology Today.